Using audiobook folders

I’m a brand new Zip Clip owner . I purchased the Zip primarily for audiobooks after finding my 2nd G shuffle an annoying audiobook experience because it doesn’t bookmark. I have been reading the manual but I find that it lacks some details. Two questions (at least right now): First, how does the bookmarking feature work? I sometimes move around from book to podcast to music. Second, I’ve been struggling with what’s the best way to load audiobooks to the zip. I’m using WinXP and Audible.com, sometimes Librivox. I have authorized the device and have both Windows Media Manager and Audible Manager. My third question (patience, please) concerns folders. What’s the difference between the Audiobook folder and it’s sub folder, Audible and how do they work when receiving content?

So, a few responses:

The Audible folder:  The Audible folder is used for holding your Audible audiobooks.  I don’t know if they must go there for features to work, but it seems like a good way, at least, to help keep things organized.  That’s where I’ve put mine (and why I don’t know if the Audible files can be stored elsewhere).

Transferring audibooks:  Personally, I like to use good old copy and paste–simple.  Windows Media Player is often used by many (although I dislike it), as well as other software such as MediaMonkey.  Having said that, if an audiobook uses DRM (digital rights management), you tend to have to use a particular software provided by the provider (or WMP), and often need to have the Clip set to USB MTP (as versus MSC) mode–MTP mode is needed to transfer DRM’ed content.  With Audible files, that means using the Audible Manager; although, at least earlier, you could simply copy and paste Audible files onto your player once you had authorized the player with Audible, and could transfer the content files with the player set to USB MSC mode, if I recall correctly (I don’t know if that still is the case–I assume it is).  But there are some advantages, I recall, to using the Audible Manager to transfer Audible files (although I was fine without it earlier, when it initially would not work with the Clip Zip, not yet having been updated for the new player).

Bookmarks:  As a general matter, the Clip automatically will bookmark where you left off each of your audiobooks (and, I believe, podcasts)–not just the one you were on when you shut the player off (the case with music files).  The next time you go to the audiobook (or podcast), the Clip will ask if you want to resume where you left off.  For this to work, the audiobooks or podcasts, I believe, need to be stored in the Audiobooks or Podcasts folders (easy to do, and good for file organization), or the ID3 Genre tag for the files needs to be set to Audiobook or Podcast.

(I think I have this right, but it’s been awhile since I’ve used the player for audiobooks or podcasts.  Your mileage may vary, and perhaps others will pipe in some . . . .)

Thanks, Miikerman. My download and transfer attempts so far have been hit and miss. Sometimes things land in the Audiobooks folder and sometimes in Audibles. Weird. Yesterday, no problem using Audible Manager and Windows Media Player. Tonight I just tried downloading three books using Audible Manager. One came through successfully, but the other two stalled for two hours! I had to cancel the process. Nice, simple drag and drop (copy and paste) does not seem to work. I’ll give it another try tomorrow. I’m just trying to get one process down pat. It seems each time I try, something different happens. I am also confused about when and why to use USB MTP (as versus MSC) mode–MT. Gee, shouldn’t this be easier? Before I purchased the device, I called Audible.com support to ask for a recommendation. The rep said he had heard that there were problems with the zip and said “you get what you pay for.” I decided to buy the Sandisk anyway because of the many good reviews, but now I’m a little frustrated.

When the Zip came out, it was very frustrating, as the Audible Manager had not yet been updated to handle it (I’m not sure why that was needed, as the Zip is similar to the Clip±-but I guess “not enough”); SanDisk was saying that the issue was with Audible and Audible was saying that the issue was with SanDisk . . . .  Great fun to be a consumer between 2 companies, in that circumstance.  

Here was my solution at the time:

_1. Use the Audible Manager or the Audible Download Manager to “activate” the Clip Zip, just as you normally do to use any new device with Audible.

  1. Once that has been done, simply copy and paste your Audible audiobook files (just like you do with regular files on your computer) from where they are stored on your computer to the Clip Zip’s Audible folder. (If you are not sure where the Audible audiobook files are stored on your computer, the Audible software indicates the location–typically, in a downloads folder stored under an Audible folder under My Documents.) 

And then, voila! The Audible audiobooks now are on your player and can be listened to. I actually even prefer this simple copy and paste method over having to fire up the Audible software to transfer the audiobook files–it’s faster and easier.

In the alternative, you can use Windows Media Player (WMP 11 worked for me) to sync Audible audiobook files you choose to the Clip Zip. WMP itself even will ask if you want to activate the Clip Zip for Audible files (which you need to do, as noted above) in the process. Again, simple to do._

In my humble experience, media managers just so often seem to complicate matters and sometimes just seem to, well, goof.  This has been my experience with WMP and the Audible Manager, at least.  The reason I liked my “discovery” of the ability to use copy-and-paste with Audible files earlier.  It seemed to just work, and you were assured where on your player the files would end up.  But if it isn’t working for you, perhaps Audible has changed its system again?  But I would give it another try.

I must say, I find Audible’s comment to you about the Clip Zip to be a bit catty and unprofessional.  Especially where  at least the original issue between the 2 companies seems to have been on the part of Audible. 

As to USB MSC and MTP connection modes:  

MSC mode is the tried-and-true, under which your device is simply seen as an external storage device.  It just works.  MTP mode, developed by Microsoft, generally is needed when transferring DRM’ed files,and transfers the license to use the files along with the files.  Unfortunately, it sometimes can be less than perfect, a reason why many Clip users prefer to set their players to USB MSC mode.  In investigating Audible issues earlier, I believe I discovered that MSC mode is just fine for Audible files, though, as the Audible DRM license is transferred when you separately authorize the player.

Do note, with the 2 USB modes:  your computer only sees the files that were transferred to the player under the mode in which your player then is connected to the computer.  Hence, a good reason to set the player to either MSC or MTP mode consistently:  so your computer can see all the player’s files at the same time.  And a good reason to avoid the “Auto” USB mode, in which your computer tries to connect under MTP mode but can fall back to MSC mode, leading to a mix of files.

My biggest recommendation, as you are dloing:  keep on trying and get a system down.  And then it should be smooth sailing.   :slight_smile:

When the Zip came out, it was very frustrating, as the Audible Manager had not yet been updated to handle it (I’m not sure why that was needed, as the Zip is similar to the Clip±-but I guess “not enough”); SanDisk was saying that the issue was with Audible and Audible was saying that the issue was with SanDisk . . . .  Great fun to be a consumer between 2 companies, in that circumstance.  

Here was my solution at the time:

_1. Use the Audible Manager or the Audible Download Manager to “activate” the Clip Zip, just as you normally do to use any new device with Audible.

  1. Once that has been done, simply copy and paste your Audible audiobook files (just like you do with regular files on your computer) from where they are stored on your computer to the Clip Zip’s Audible folder. (If you are not sure where the Audible audiobook files are stored on your computer, the Audible software indicates the location–typically, in a downloads folder stored under an Audible folder under My Documents.) 

And then, voila! The Audible audiobooks now are on your player and can be listened to. I actually even prefer this simple copy and paste method over having to fire up the Audible software to transfer the audiobook files–it’s faster and easier.

In the alternative, you can use Windows Media Player (WMP 11 worked for me) to sync Audible audiobook files you choose to the Clip Zip. WMP itself even will ask if you want to activate the Clip Zip for Audible files (which you need to do, as noted above) in the process. Again, simple to do._

In my humble experience, media managers just so often seem to complicate matters and sometimes just seem to, well, goof.  This has been my experience with WMP and the Audible Manager, at least.  The reason I liked my “discovery” of the ability to use copy-and-paste with Audible files earlier.  It seemed to just work, and you were assured where on your player the files would end up.  But if it isn’t working for you, perhaps Audible has changed its system again?  But I would give it another try.

I must say, I find Audible’s comment to you about the Clip Zip to be a bit catty and unprofessional.  Especially where  at least the original issue between the 2 companies seems to have been on the part of Audible. 

As to USB MSC and MTP connection modes:  

MSC mode is the tried-and-true, under which your device is simply seen as an external storage device.  It just works.  MTP mode, developed by Microsoft, generally is needed when transferring DRM’ed files,and transfers the license to use the files along with the files.  Unfortunately, it sometimes can be less than perfect, a reason why many Clip users prefer to set their players to USB MSC mode.  In investigating Audible issues earlier, I believe I discovered that MSC mode is just fine for Audible files, though, as the Audible DRM license is transferred when you separately authorize the player.

Do note, with the 2 USB modes:  your computer only sees the files that were transferred to the player under the mode in which your player then is connected to the computer.  Hence, a good reason to set the player to either MSC or MTP mode consistently:  so your computer can see all the player’s files at the same time.  And a good reason to avoid the “Auto” USB mode, in which your computer tries to connect under MTP mode but can fall back to MSC mode, leading to a mix of files.

My biggest recommendation, as you are dloing:  keep on trying and get a system down.  And then it should be smooth sailing.    :smiley:

When the Zip came out, it was very frustrating, as the Audible Manager had not yet been updated to handle it (I’m not sure why that was needed, as the Zip is similar to the Clip±-but I guess “not enough”); SanDisk was saying that the issue was with Audible and Audible was saying that the issue was with SanDisk . . . .  Great fun to be a consumer between 2 companies, in that circumstance.  

Here was my solution at the time:

_1. Use the Audible Manager or the Audible Download Manager to “activate” the Clip Zip, just as you normally do to use any new device with Audible.

  1. Once that has been done, simply copy and paste your Audible audiobook files (just like you do with regular files on your computer) from where they are stored on your computer to the Clip Zip’s Audible folder. (If you are not sure where the Audible audiobook files are stored on your computer, the Audible software indicates the location–typically, in a downloads folder stored under an Audible folder under My Documents.) 

And then, voila! The Audible audiobooks now are on your player and can be listened to. I actually even prefer this simple copy and paste method over having to fire up the Audible software to transfer the audiobook files–it’s faster and easier.

In the alternative, you can use Windows Media Player (WMP 11 worked for me) to sync Audible audiobook files you choose to the Clip Zip. WMP itself even will ask if you want to activate the Clip Zip for Audible files (which you need to do, as noted above) in the process. Again, simple to do._

In my humble experience, media managers just so often seem to complicate matters and sometimes just seem to, well, goof.  This has been my experience with WMP and the Audible Manager, at least.  The reason I liked my “discovery” of the ability to use copy-and-paste with Audible files earlier.  It seemed to just work, and you were assured where on your player the files would end up.  But if it isn’t working for you, perhaps Audible has changed its system again?  But I would give it another try.  

I must say, I find the Audible rep.'s comment to you about the Clip Zip to be a bit catty and unprofessional.  Especially where  at least the original issue between the 2 companies seems to have been on the part of Audible. 

As to USB MSC and MTP connection modes:  

MSC mode is the tried-and-true, under which your device is simply seen as an external storage device.  It just works.  MTP mode, developed by Microsoft, generally is needed when transferring DRM’ed files,and transfers the license to use the files along with the files.  Unfortunately, it sometimes can be less than perfect, a reason why many Clip users prefer to set their players to USB MSC mode.  In investigating Audible issues earlier, I believe I discovered that MSC mode is just fine for Audible files, though, as the Audible DRM license is transferred when you separately authorize the player.

Do note, with the 2 USB modes:  your computer only sees the files that were transferred to the player under the mode in which your player then is connected to the computer.  Hence, a good reason to set the player to either MSC or MTP mode consistently:  so your computer can see all the player’s files at the same time.  And a good reason to avoid the “Auto” USB mode, in which your computer tries to connect under MTP mode but can fall back to MSC mode, leading to a mix of files.

My biggest recommendation, as you are doing:  keep on trying and get a system down.  And then it should be smooth sailing.    :smiley:

When the Zip came out, it was very frustrating, as the Audible Manager had not yet been updated to handle it (I’m not sure why that was needed, as the Zip is similar to the Clip±-but I guess “not enough”); SanDisk was saying that the issue was with Audible and Audible was saying that the issue was with SanDisk . . . .  Great fun to be a consumer between 2 companies, in that circumstance. 

Here was my solution at the time:

1. Use the Audible Manager or the Audible Download Manager to “activate” the Clip Zip, just as you normally do to use any new device with Audible.

2. Once that has been done, simply copy and paste your Audible audiobook files (just like you do with regular files on your computer) from where they are stored on your computer to the Clip Zip’s Audible folder. (If you are not sure where the Audible audiobook files are stored on your computer, the Audible software indicates the location–typically, in a downloads folder stored under an Audible folder under My Documents.)

And then, voila! The Audible audiobooks now are on your player and can be listened to. I actually even prefer this simple copy and paste method over having to fire up the Audible software to transfer the audiobook files–it’s faster and easier.

In the alternative, you can use Windows Media Player (WMP 11 worked for me) to sync Audible audiobook files you choose to the Clip Zip. WMP itself even will ask if you want to activate the Clip Zip for Audible files (which you need to do, as noted above) in the process. Again, simple to do.

In my humble experience, media managers just so often seem to complicate matters and sometimes just seem to, well, goof.  This has been my experience with WMP and the Audible Manager, at least.  The reason I liked my “discovery” of the ability to use copy-and-paste with Audible files earlier.  It seemed to just work, and you were assured where on your player the files would end up.  But if it isn’t working for you, perhaps Audible has changed its system again?  But I would give it another try. 

I must say, I find the Audible rep.'s comment to you about the Clip Zip to be a bit catty and unprofessional.  Especially where  at least the original issue between the 2 companies seems to have been on the part of Audible.

As to USB MSC and MTP connection modes: 

MSC mode is the tried-and-true, under which your device is simply seen as an external storage device.  It just works.  MTP mode, developed by Microsoft, generally is needed when transferring DRM’ed files,and transfers the license to use the files along with the files.  Unfortunately, it sometimes can be less than perfect, a reason why many Clip users prefer to set their players to USB MSC mode.  In investigating Audible issues earlier, I believe I discovered that MSC mode is just fine for Audible files, though, as the Audible DRM license is transferred when you separately authorize the player.

Do note, with the 2 USB modes:  your computer only sees the files that were transferred to the player under the mode in which your player then is connected to the computer.  Hence, a good reason to set the player to either MSC or MTP mode consistently:  so your computer can see all the player’s files at the same time.  And a good reason to avoid the “Auto” USB mode, in which your computer tries to connect under MTP mode but can fall back to MSC mode, leading to a mix of files.

My biggest recommendation, as you are doing:  keep on trying and get a system down.  And then it should be smooth sailing. 

Audible went through a few transitions just before the Sansa Clip Zip was released.  This caused a bit of confusion when the device debuted.

Starting with the Fuze+, Audible’s DRM format changed to a more “ecumenical” platform.  Previously, audiobooks had to be transferred to the target device using the Audible Manager, or via Windows Media Player using a variation on the Audible client software.  Audible content loaded on a microSD card would only play on the matching authorized device, as it relied on the WMDRM-10 standard.  The Fuze+ offered the first glimpse of the new system, effectively playing any Audible book loaded.

With an update, the Fuze+ enjoyed the new DRM method first: the Fuze+ could play files from any other device authorized by the Audible Manager.  This update was added to the Clip Zip later, making transfers easier.  The initial problem was that many customers still had the earlier client version.

Currently, once the player is authorized using the Audible Manager, you have several handy options.  The Manager adds a plugin to Windows Media Player, a pop-up that allows chapter browsing within the books, when listening using Windows Media Player.  Books downloaded from Audible are automatically added to a new playlist in Windows Media Player called “Audible” as well.  Your book collection will appear in the Windows Media Player library.

Using the latest firmware on your Clip Zip, the device will automatically index your Audible books  under Books > Audiobooks.  In the future, I hope that the currently playing book will be added as a pointer, so that when returning to Audible on the device, the currently playing book is automatically selected, rather than just the complete list (the current book should be highlighted).

As you will find, Audible books can be transferred in MSC or MTP mode using the new system, using Windows Explorer, the Audible Manager client, or Windows Media Player.  Much better.

Audible changed their system to make books readily available using a wider range of portable devices, including mobile phones.

For any files that you would like bookmarking, if they are manually transferred to the podcast or audiobook folder, you will have the bookmark function.

Ah, I almost forgot.  Audible books are downloaded using a separate application, the Download Manager.  This is the pop up window that you see when downloads begin. The Download Manager appears once you select a book for download when signed in to Audible.com online. If a book transfer is going slowly, you can pause and resume, or restart the download later, if their server is busy, or your internet connection has slowed for some reason.

Bob  :smileyvery-happy:

Neutron_bob and Miikerman,

Thanks for very detailed explanations. I was successful downloading  those books from Audible last night. Once I clicked “Take No Action” in WMP and relied solely on Audible Manager, the download went smoothly. It seems that the two programs might have been competing and causing complications. Now, is there any way I can change the order of the list of titles in the Audible Manager pane and in the Sandisk pane while in Audible Manager? I needed to re-download a a section of a title because I changed the format from 4 to enhanced and now I have something that looks like this: Part 2, Part 3, several other single titles, and then Part 1. It shows up like this on my player also. Just drives me a little nuts to look at things out of order. (In iTunes I can do this pretty easily.) I also noticed that some titles go directly into the Audiobooks folder and some go into Audiobook/Audibles on the device. Hmmm.

Ah yes, the Audible Formats.  Over the last two years, Audible has been migrating to formats 4 and Enhanced for the Sansas.

No worries, formats aa and aax, respectively, both play on the device.  But there’s one little problem.  You can have two versions of the same book on the device. The index will show both identical book sections.  Using the Audible Manager is best for this issue.

With the Manager client open, simply plug in your Clip Zip, and a list of all books on the device including which format was used will show as an icon next to the book.  I had almost forgotten about duplicates in different Audible formats.  In testing, I have multiple microSD cards with Formats 2-4 and Enhanced.  Choosing the correct format is a matter of scrolling down the list. If you have duplicates, this is a familiar scenario.  Using the Manager, simply click on the version you’d like to remove from the Sansa and “pick” it from the device.

I really like Format 3 for the Sansa e280, as I can have a large book collection on a few microSD cards.  Format 3 is half the size of the later variants, which sounds very good for spoken word.  Format 4 is clearer, like listening to a CD versus FM broadcast, but book files are in the order of 130MB per section.  Yes, I really prefer unabridged editions, hehe.

For the latest Sansas, we have to stick with Formats 4 or Enhanced.

Bob  :wink:

Switching from Format 4 to Enhanced Format is how I got titles so disorganized. Here is the very polite and helpful response I received in an email response from Audible.com about sorting titles: “Thank you for contacting Audible, my name is ________ (I removed the name) and it is my pleasure to be handling your issue today. I understand that you would like to sort your Audible Manager library as it is currently sorting by download date. I do apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused and I will be happy to assist you with this. Once you have opened your Audible Manager, ensure that you are looking at the full Library view by clicking on “Library” on the top left side of Audible Manager. This will show all titles stored on your computer. You may sort your titles by “Date”, “Title”, “Author”, “Size”, or “Running Time” by clicking on the header options located over the middle section of Audible Manager. You will see that there is an arrow on the the section that Audible Manager is sorting by. To ensure that the titles are sorted in alphabetical and chronological order, make sure that the arrow on your preferred sorting option is pointing downwards. You may change the direction by clicking on the Header more than once. Thanks again for contacting Audible, I hope this was satisfactory and had addressed your issue. If you have any other questions or run into any issues, feel free to reply to this email or call our customer care numbers at: 1-888-283-5051 (USA & Canada) 1-973-820-0400(International) We are open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week! Sincerely, Audible Customer Support” I followed these clear instructions and now my titles are properly sorted. However, now I have a different issue, the one you mention about duplicates. I deleted the extra Format 4 titles using Audible Manager and kept the Enhanced versions. Yes, they are larger files and do take longer to download, but I don’t need to keep all my books on the Sandisk. I can remove them from the player after I finish reading. Everything looks fine in Audible Manager’s Library pane and in the device pane, but what is actually on my Clip Zip and what AudMan shows is different. I now have 3 copies of the book on the player (actually 9 because the book has three parts!). Six parts are in Audiobooks and three parts are in Audiobooks/Audible. I want to delete the extra ones, but when operating on just the Sandisk without AudMan I can’t tell identify their formats. I want to keep the Enhanced version and delete the Format 4 versions. Do you guys have any ideas? I about ready to delete them all from the device and re-transfer the ones I want.

As you note, sometimes just starting over from scratch can be the cleanest solution.  

Yes, starting from scratch is exactly what I did to remove the duplicate copies. I removed all versions and re-downloaded the enhanced format. Any idea why the Audible Manager device pane doesn’t show all the copies that are actually on the device? (Also, my apologies for my last lengthy post. Even though I’m hitting the return key twice and I have clearly separated paragraphs in my drafts, the final posts do not reflect that.)

Don’t know why the Audible Manager (malfunctions) as it does.  I dislike managers like it–they just seem to malfunction, as versus simple copy-and-paste, which just, well, works . . . .

Audible Manager seems to be working for me at the moment with some unexplainable weirdness now and then. I’ll definitely have to learn how to use the copy and paste method. Both you and neutron bob recommend this method. I’m also playing around with the most streamlined way to put music files on my new Zip. So far, I really like this little device. My first experience with MP3 players was with a 1G Shuffle, cute as can be, but limited.Thanks for all your patience and help, you two. I’ll go experiment and play now and let you lend your wisdom to others.

Drag-and-drop/copy-and-paste is easy as pie.  Just go to where your files are located on your computer, highlight (select) them, right click on the highlighted block and select copy (or simply press ctrl + c), go to where you want to put the files on your Clip, and right click on an empty space in the folder and select paste (or press ctrl + v).  Voila!   :slight_smile:

Hi there, just bought my first Sansa (the Clip Zip) and starting the learning curve (been using a Creative Zen V for years - and that was my 1st player so I don’t have a lot of experience w/ other players).  I have a lot of personal development CDs that I have transferred to MP3 or WMA files and I am hoping I can use the drag and drop functionality and put in the Audiobook or Podcast folder to take advantage of the nice automatic bookmarking feature (very nice) and keep the music folder to strictly music.  Before I drop my entire library on the unit, I tried a few items to make sure it worked and in one case, the folder I dragged to the Podcast folder didn’t show the name of the folder in the list but it did have all the CDs content in the one podcast folder and the other two programs both showed up where each CD was it’s own Podcast even though when I dragged them into the clip, all the files were in one folder and in order.  Any suggestions?  I’ve spent some time searching this site and others and I am hoping someone with more experience than me can save me a few hours of trial and error. :wink:

Thanks in advance!

Why use the Podcast folder? Use the Audiobook one.

And you’re sure that the files are in a format compatible with the Clip and are not DRM-protected?  And are the ID3 tags filled in?

I can easily change the folder to audiobook, however I did put some other ripped programs in the audiobook folder with the same result where each CD was showing up as a seperate audiobook - even though I had made a new folder for the program and copied all the files from each CD into it to have them all in one folder.  

It appears as though all the CDs I have ripped are in WMA format which should be compatible according to what I have read in the manual.  I have done nothing with the tags (yet).  I am a novice at this and am hoping I can avoid putting many hours into getting all my content onto a this player. 

My ultimate goal would be to be able to drag and drop the folders that I have already set up with all the audio programs and have them look like individual audiobooks in the clip zip.  

Thanks again for your feedback!  I know how easy it is to sink hours and hours trying to learn the best way to do something a new device. :slight_smile: