Songs play in a different tone

I just got a Sansa Fuze and it seems as if the songs play in a lower tone than they do normally. I tried to play a few songs on my Clip and Fuze and listen to them at the same time and the Fuze definitely lowers the tone. I already got the latest firmware and have messed around with the equalizer. It also seems the songs play slightly slower than normal…nothing drastic though. Is there anything I can do or should I send it back?

Are the songs in the music folder? If they are in the podcast or audiobook folders, then there is a speed setting for those folders that might be set to slow. If so, set it to normal.

I just transferred a few files into the podcasts folder and the speed setting was set to normal and I changed it to fast and that just made it to fast. The speed isn’t my main concern, it’s just that the songs don’t sound right. It’s as if someone has tuned the guitar down in all of the songs. Not sure if I can do anything about this.

Although I would guess that since the speed is slightly off that the tone is slightly off as well? Anyone else have this same problem and if so is there anything I can do?

What we need to make sure of is that your songs are in the songs folder. If they are not then you need to move them there. So Open windows explorer with the fuze pluged in and then open the fuze like you would a hard drive. Go to music folder and then songs see if there is anything there. If no then search around for a while and try to find your files cut and paste them in the songs folder. if you have done this already, delete your files and try to transfer agian.

There is no songs folder. I open the music folder and all my music is in it. I will try transferring the files again.

I deleted a few files and added them again and I’m still having the same problem. They’re just a little slower and are tuned down. I listened to a file on my computer using one set of headphones and listened to the same file on my Fuze through another set of headphones at the same time and started the songs at the exact same time. At first they seemed to go together, but the file on my computer started to get ahead of the song on my fuze and I didn’t touch anything. It’s as if the Fuze is playing the songs at .75 or .85 speed. I have a feeling this is a problem that I can’t fix. Have there been many complaints about this? I saw someone on Amazon had the same problem.

@peasouptexan7 wrote:
There is no songs folder. I open the music folder and all my music is in it. I will try transferring the files again.

The songs folder IS your MUSIC folder.

It sounds like you are describing a ‘pitch’ variance when playback is not exactly at the same speed as the original. And yes, there are other posts/complaints about this here, although I think it has been on the Clip board. You can do a search. I would return the player and get a different one. There is no manual way of adjusting the pitch or speed that you can do.

I checked on my Fuze and indeed it also plays both movies and mp3’s slow.  In my case I start them in sync on the PC and the fuze, and after about 10 minutes the fuze is about 6 seconds behind. This translates into about a 1% speed error, which is about twice the “just noticable difference” for pitch. I don’t really hear the pitch - but after a bad experience with my friends asking why the music is playing in the wrong key I have paid attention ever since.

Just to try to nail it down… does the player’s clock run slow too?  I would think everything is running off the same crystal oscillator. 

@mp3geek wrote:
I checked on my Fuze and indeed it also plays both movies and mp3’s slow.  In my case I start them in sync on the PC and the fuze, and after about 10 minutes the fuze is about 6 seconds behind. This translates into about a 1% speed error, which is about twice the “just noticable difference” for pitch. I don’t really hear the pitch - but after a bad experience with my friends asking why the music is playing in the wrong key I have paid attention ever since.

You’re being vague here and not specifying the exact issue here. Are you saying that a movie is 6 seconds slow after 10 minutes, or an .mp3 music file? You said ‘both’. If it’s a video file, what was the source, what conversion process did you use? What settings did you specify in the coversion program? Is it both the audio AND video portion, or one or the other?

If you talking about an .mp3 file, again what is the source? Did you get this on-line? From where? Did you rip this from a CD yourself? Using what program? At what bit-rate?

While it’s possible that your Fuze is defective, you need to determine whether or not it is something caused by you or something you’ve done. There is another current thread on this same subject, and by not giving details and just making a blanket statement as you have is obscure and mis-leading. Other people may make their decisions based on what they read, and by suggesting there is a problem without any substantiating data to back it up is unfair to anyone else concerned with the same issue.

And not to ‘dis’ your friend, but what was his (or her) ‘bad experinece’ and why should that influence you and whether you are happy with your Fuze or not. Is it possible you are placing his (or her) opinion in too high a value and basing this on what they say, rather than what you hear and/or see? The power of suggestion has been proven time and time again. I tell you that you don’t look well. Pretty soon, you start feeling sick. Someone joins the forum here and posts, “I have a problem with XYZ!” and suddenly out of the blue 5 other previously un-heard from people chime in and say, " Me, too" or “I have the exact same problem.” My first thought/reaction is always, if you had this problem and you knew about it, then why didn’t YOU say something?

See what I mean? Are you really dis-satisfied with this and see it as a problem, or does the fact that your friend said there is something ‘wrong’ with your player bother you and so now you ‘see’ it too? Just out of curiosity, what type/brand of player does her (or she) have? An i-pod maybe? :wink:

@mp3geek wrote:
I checked on my Fuze and indeed it also plays both movies and mp3’s slow.  In my case I start them in sync on the PC and the fuze, and after about 10 minutes the fuze is about 6 seconds behind. This translates into about a 1% speed error, which is about twice the “just noticable difference” for pitch. I don’t really hear the pitch - but after a bad experience with my friends asking why the music is playing in the wrong key I have paid attention ever since.

You’re being vague here and not specifying the exact issue. Are you saying that a movie is 6 seconds slow after 10 minutes, or an .mp3 music file? You said ‘both’. If it’s a video file, what was the source, what conversion process did you use? What settings did you specify in the coversion program? Is it both the audio AND video portion, or one or the other?

If you talking about an .mp3 file, again what is the source? Did you get this on-line? From where? Did you rip this from a CD yourself? Using what program? At what bit-rate?

While it’s possible that your Fuze is defective, you need to determine whether or not it is something caused by you or something you’ve done. There is another current thread on this same subject, and by not giving details and just making a blanket statement as you have is obscure and mis-leading. Other people may make their decisions based on what they read, and by suggesting there is a problem without any substantiating data to back it up is unfair to anyone else concerned with the same issue.

And not to ‘dis’ your friend, but what was his (or her) ‘bad experinece’ and why should that influence you and whether you are happy with your Fuze or not. Is it possible you are placing his (or her) opinion in too high a value and basing this on what they say, rather than what you hear and/or see? The power of suggestion has been proven time and time again. I tell you that you don’t look well. Pretty soon, you start feeling sick. Someone joins the forum here and posts, “I have a problem with XYZ!” and suddenly out of the blue 5 other previously un-heard from people chime in and say, " Me, too" or “I have the exact same problem.” My first thought/reaction is always, if you had this problem and you knew about it, then why didn’t YOU say something?

See what I mean? Are you really dis-satisfied with this and see it as a problem, or does the fact that your friend said there is something ‘wrong’ with your player bother you and so now you ‘see’ it too? Just out of curiosity, what type/brand of player does her (or she) have? An i-pod maybe? :wink:

@tapeworm wrote:


You’re being vague here and not specifying the exact issue. Are you saying that a movie is 6 seconds slow after 10 minutes, or an .mp3 music file? You said ‘both’. If it’s a video file, what was the source, what conversion process did you use? What settings did you specify in the coversion program? Is it both the audio AND video portion, or one or the other?

I am reporting very precicely an observation - that the same files played on my PC and on the Fuze do not play at the same speed. It is a fair conclusion that at least one of these devices is in error - I CANNOT say which is in error.  I performed the test with two files. One was a movie that I processed through SMC. I then played the same identical converted file on the PC and on the Fuze starting them in sync and then watching for 15-20 minutes.  I also performed the test with an MP3 recording of a long chapter of an audiobook, which makes it easy to look for speed differences after 10 to 20 minutes. Both had a discrepancy of about 1% in the playback speed. The movie by the way still had perfect sync between sound and image.

My MP3 and AVI files are inadequate to really measure the absolute accuracy of the playback, since both were created by uncalibrated devices and neither contains a true timebase. It would help if someone could provide a reference MP3 file that is encoded on a true crystal controlled encoder and contains a very plain time signal, like a ticking clock or something like that. I have other PC’s and MP3 players in the house I could test like this, but likely not the energy to do it without a proper referecence file.

 

 

@tapeworm wrote:


And not to ‘dis’ your friend, but what was his (or her) ‘bad experinece’ and why should that influence you and whether you are happy with your Fuze or not. Is it possible you are placing his (or her) opinion in too high a value and basing this on what they say, rather than what you hear and/or see?   …  See what I mean? Are you really dis-satisfied with this and see it as a problem, or does the fact that your friend said there is something ‘wrong’ with your player bother you and so now you ‘see’ it too? Just out of curiosity, what type/brand of player does her (or she) have? An i-pod maybe? :wink:

The incident I am refering to occured about 30 years ago, with slightly inferior equipment. The point of bringing it up was to remind the readers that some people do indeed have perfect pitch, and will notice a small change in the playback speed. It is likely that a 1% error is small enough that I will never notice, and I have not noticed any ill effects. But this is large enough that it likely could be heard in a careful A/B test of pure tones. I used to spend considerable effort measuring the speed of my devices - and have been known to unravel a cassette tape and measure it with a tape measure. As technology has improved I thought the need to perform such tests had passed. Perhaps it is too much to put a crystal oscillator in each MP3 player.

If there is no crystal could one calibrate the internal timebase to the PC time clock when it is plugged in?

I am not doubting what you say and it’s obvious that you have done some extensive detective work, but you still did not answer my first question. Do both the video and audio files lose exactly 6 seconds after 10 minutes of playback?

If it is one or the other, then you have isolated something that is different and can possibly narrow it down further. See what I’m getting at? But if both the audio and video are exactly the same and both are exactly 6 seconds slow, then that would point more toward the internal clock/speed of the device playing both files. In this case, your Fuze.

If this is the case, then quite possibly you have a defective unit. There’s no way I know of to ‘tweak’ it or speed it up. It’s not like on older cars where you can adjust the timing or bump up the idle speed by turning a screw or something. I still say this behavior would be ‘out of the norm’ and not indicative of the entire line, so replacing it with another unit most likely would solve the problem. :wink:

Yes - both the MP3 and AVI are slow compared to the PC by “about” the same amount. The measure is not very precise… my stopwatch was simply my saying “one thousand one, one thousand two…”.  Returning the device to simply get another that is just as far off or maybe even a little worse is alot of effort for no gain. And 1% is is within the range of some older audio equipment (that I avoided). Perhaps someone here knows the spec on the absolute playback speed.

By the way - you can perform a similar test once you find a suitable piece. Maybe all you have to do is use the fuze to record an FM talk show for 20 minutes, then play the MP3 on both the fuze and the PC.