Audio Book

I just bought a Sansa Clip MP3 2 G.  I initially intended to use it strictly for Audio Book and my Shuffle for my music but I decided to move it all to the Sansa.   Here lies my problem.  I use Windows Vista.  I download my music and Books from Limewire.  Last night I downloaded 2 books from Limewire.  When I moved them from I tunes to the Sansa it put them in my Music folder.   I want them in the Audibook folder on the Sansa.  Can anyone help?  I have YIM messenger as well as AIM if need be.

Thanks

74 hits and no responses???  I NEED HELP PEEPS!

If your audiobooks are not in .AA format (proprietary to Audible.com) they will not show up in the audiobook folder as the folder currently only recognizes .AA files as audiobooks.

This being said, we should have a firmware out soon that will allow you to place an audio file into the audiobook folder on the clip and allow that file to act as a true .AA file (it will also show up in Audiobooks on the player’s GUI)

Firstly, the Audiobook folder is currently reserved for Audible .aa format files.

Your problem may be in the p2p crap- Limewire.  Unless you have a digital Ouija board, who knows what condition the ripped files are in.  Also, the .aa format requires synchronization with a valid Audible account- not data slipped under the door.  The current Audiobook folder is for Audible files.

In the coming firmware, there is a planned separate audio book / podcast folder.

Have you tried playing the book by loading it into the “Music” folder?

Bob  :neutral_face:

So have this feature been implemented? I’d like the ability to have non-Audible audiobooks appear in the “Audiobooks” category in the player’s menu. And I don’t want audiobooks to be shuffled with regular music.

@neutron_bob wrote:

the .aa format requires synchronization with a valid Audible account- not data slipped under the door. The current Audiobook folder is for Audible files.

Yikes! That’s a little big brother-esque. Thanks for the heads up. Think I’ll pass on the audiobooks (not that I was ever really interested in them in the 1st place but to hell with sync a ‘valid Audible acct’ bidness ;) 

 

The latest firmware update does address this issue and does allow you to copy audiobook files (not just audible…I copied just plain old mp3 files) into the folder: Audiobooks. There is also a Podcasts folder, but I have yet to use that one.

The files that you copy into the Audiobooks folder will get automatically bookmarked once you start to play one of them. You can then switch out to your music files, and whenever you come back to the audiobook folder files, you will be prompted to “Resume Playback” or “Start from Beginning”…sa-weet, eh?

The only issue I ran into was that the audiobooks that I loaded were broken into several (often many) separate mp3 files per book. Using the method I just described, you would still need to recall which sub-file you last were listening to, in order to resume the playback at the correct place in your book…make sense?

Anyway, a simple way around this (thanx to tk421 in this thread: http://forums.sandisk.com/sansa/board/message?board.id=clip&thread.id=6790)was to just merge the individual sections (files) of the book into one large mp3 file. This way when I return from listening to some tunes and “resume playback” on my book, I just select the overall book file (the merged one) and it starts exactly where I left off last time I was there (it’s bookmarked!).

This is a very useful upgrade to this player, if you use it at all for audiobooks, that are not from Audible.

There may be other ways around the multiple-file/merge issue with books, maybe subfolders work…dunno…I just merged them with “MP3 Merger” (freeware)…I’m sure there are numerous ways to do this as well. This one works so simply, so I stuck with it.

In summary, if you are thinking of *not* buying the Sansa Clip becauseof concerns of audiobook bookmarking, etc, scratch that concern off your list. It is a great audiobook player.

Message Edited by yoyorobbo on 05-27-2008 11:43 AM

Message Edited by yoyorobbo on 05-27-2008 11:48 AM

Message Edited by yoyorobbo on 05-27-2008 11:49 AM

Okay, so I’m thinking of buying the newer Clip, but all of the talk about audiobook issues scares me off.  I do assume some of the issues have been fixed in the new model; however, I have never owned an MP3 player, so know nothing of the various formats, downloading tunes or books to an MP3 player, etc.

Simple question:

1.  I have several books on CD to which I’ve never listened.      How exactly would I download them to a Clip if I buy it?

2.  I will obviously be downloading books from the internet eventually (Amazon? where?)    How exactly do I do that?  (I assume it would be best to download them to the memory card???  Is that done by leaving it in the clip?  What is “Audible”?

3.  Is there an informative site out there that might explain this step-by-step?

(I told you I was new to all of this!!!)

Thanks a million for helping me out on this!

It’s all fairly easy, once you get the process down.

1.  Audiobook CDs generally are in an audio format.  To play the audiobook files on a digital audio player (DAP), you need to “rip” them into a computer format the DAP recognizes, such as the MP3 format.  There are many free computer software “rippers” out there; I use one called CDex (Internet freeware), but it takes a bit longer to learn initially (read the included Help files).  Windows Media Player and iTunes also will rip CDs.  In the end, the rippers convert the audio CD files into computer files that you can play on your DAP.  It is a very automatic process, omce you get going.

Whatever you use, take time, initially, to learn its settings and how it works.  Really!  You will have many options, including the “rip rate”–how much compression is made in the resulting files.  The more the compression, the less the space the files take, but the lower the audio quality.  Having said that, this is less important with spoken word files than with music.

When you rip the files, your ripper likely will have the option to fill in “ID3 tags” for the files, using free Internet databases.  Tags are information that identify the files, under categories such as artist, title, album, genre and year.  Many modern players, including the Clip, use the tags (which are embedded into the computer files) for navigation, display and organization purposes.  You also can edit this information and fill the information in manually–Windows lets you do this by right-clicking on the files and going under Properties, or you can use a free tag editor such as MP3Tag (easier for more than quick editing).  As a general matter, make sure this process is done–the Clip generally needs the tag information. 

(Having said that, the Clip+, instead of using the tags, also can navigate and display file information by folder view, like on your computer; helpful if you don’t put in the tag information.  Also, and not to complicate matters, for files put into the Clip’s Audiobooks and Podcasts folders, the Clip will use the file and folder names for organization and display purposes even under ID3 view, if the ID3 tags are not filled in–a benefit for using those folders.)

Once you have ripped the CDs and filled in the tags, you simply transfer a copy of the files to your Clip (always best to keep a copy elsewhere, as a backup).  I find it best to use the Clip’s Music, Audiobooks and Podcasts folders, to transfer the files to, keeping the files in a folder with the book’s or album’s title–this helps for organization and offers further Clip bookmarking benefits for podcasts and audiobooks. 

2.  Audiobooks are available all over.  Internet websites; Internet stores (including Amazon.com); Internet subscription services; bookstores; libraries; etc.  If the audiobooks are not yet in MP3 or other Clip-compatible form (such as with audiobook CDs), you follow the above.  Otherwise, you simply download to your computer following the website instructions, and then copy them over to your Clip.  (You can download them directly to your Clip connected to your computer, but, again, it is safest to have a second copy around, in case something happens to the copy on the Clip.)  If you have a Clip+, you can transfer the files to the player’s internal memory or to a memory card inserted into the Clip+'s microSD card slot; you also can take the card out of the player, put it into your computer, transfer the files to the card, and then put the card back into the player.

Audible is an audiobook subscription service:  pay a monthly fee and get a certain number of audiobooks per month.  Similar:  emusic.com

There are also audiobooks websites around, where you can get free audiobooks.  E.g., podiobooks.com.  Likewise, a multitude of free podcasts (the equivalent of radio programs)–see podcastalley.com for a huge selection. 

It takes a certain amount of time to get your system down–be patient.  But it then becomes fairly automatic.  Enjoy!

It’s all fairly easy, once you get the process down.

1.  Audiobook CDs generally are in an audio format.  To play the audiobook files on a digital audio player (DAP), you need to “rip” them into a computer format the DAP recognizes, such as the MP3 format.  There are many free computer software “rippers” out there; I use one called CDex (Internet freeware), but it takes a bit longer to learn initially (read the included Help files).  Windows Media Player and iTunes also will rip CDs.  In the end, the rippers convert the audio CD files into computer files that you can play on your DAP.  It is a very automatic process, once you get going.

Whatever you use, take time, initially, to learn its settings and how it works.  Really!  You will have many options, including the “rip rate”–how much compression is made in the resulting files.  The more the compression, the less the space the files take, but the lower the audio quality.  Having said that, this is less important with spoken word files than with music.

When you rip the files, your ripper likely will have the option to fill in “ID3 tags” for the files, using free Internet databases.  Tags are information that identify the files, under categories such as artist, title, album, genre and year.  Many modern players, including the Clip, use the tags (which are embedded into the computer files) for navigation, display and organization purposes.  You also can edit this information and fill the information in manually–Windows lets you do this by right-clicking on the files and going under Properties, or you can use a free tag editor such as MP3Tag (easier for more than quick editing).  As a general matter, make sure this process is done–the Clip generally needs the tag information. 

(Having said that, the Clip+, instead of using the tags, also can navigate and display file information by folder view, like on your computer; helpful if you don’t put in the tag information.  Also, and not to complicate matters, for files put into the Clip’s Audiobooks and Podcasts folders, the Clip will use the file and folder names for organization and display purposes even under ID3 view, if the ID3 tags are not filled in–a benefit for using those folders.)

Once you have ripped the CDs and filled in the tags, you simply transfer a copy of the files to your Clip (always best to keep a copy elsewhere, as a backup).  I find it best to use the Clip’s Music, Audiobooks and Podcasts folders, to transfer the files to, keeping the files in a folder with the book’s or album’s title–this helps for organization and offers further Clip bookmarking benefits for podcasts and audiobooks. 

2.  Audiobooks are available all over.  Internet websites; Internet stores (including Amazon.com); Internet subscription services; bookstores; libraries; etc.  If the audiobooks are not yet in MP3 or other Clip-compatible form (such as with audiobook CDs), you follow the above.  Otherwise, you simply download to your computer following the website instructions, and then copy them over to your Clip.  (You can download them directly to your Clip connected to your computer, but, again, it is safest to have a second copy around, in case something happens to the copy on the Clip.)  If you have a Clip+, you can transfer the files to the player’s internal memory or to a memory card inserted into the Clip+'s microSD card slot; you also can take the card out of the player, put it into your computer, transfer the files to the card, and then put the card back into the player.

Audible is an audiobook subscription service:  pay a monthly fee and get a certain number of audiobooks per month.  Similar:  emusic.com

There are also audiobooks websites around, where you can get free audiobooks.  E.g., podiobooks.com.  Likewise, a multitude of free podcasts (the equivalent of radio programs)–see podcastalley.com for a huge selection. 

It takes a certain amount of time to get your system down–be patient.  But it then becomes fairly automatic.  Enjoy!