Sansa Clip 2GB disk full with 2 audio books - best mp3 format quality for audio books?

Hi,

Does anyone have a clue why my new Sansa Clip 2GB mp3 player is saying ‘disk full’ when I have only loaded 2.5 audio books and one album? It is very possible it is my error as this is all new to me. I have several audio books on cd and have converted them to mp3’s with Roxio Easy CD Creator/mp3 converter. I then copied the mp3 files to the sansa clip. Half way through the second book I get the ‘disk full’ message.  One audio book is showing as 1GB in size! Thanks for any help!

REVISION: After searching this forum, I just noticed i converted all mp3’s to 320kb format (automatic for Roxio mp3 converter). I’m going to try 128kb and see what a difference that makes. If anyone can suggest the best quality (96kb?) for audio books, I would greatly appreciate the help. I’m assuming I have to start all over with the books I’ve already converted to mp3 and re-convert them with the lower kb format.

Message Edited by ekb on 05-25-2008 08:43 PM

Glad to see you figured it out.  Rip rates are very personal–you may want to experiment some.  But spoken (as versus sung) files typically can be ripped at lower rip rates–I believe that podcasts often are done at 48 kbps.  Even at 96, it will free up much space.

If you can, best to re-rip the books, for quality purposes–it avoids, in essence, a recording of a recording of a recording.

Message Edited by Miikerman on 05-26-2008 09:14 AM

64 is enough for audio books and most often forcing mono instead of stereo is OK too. If your program uses the LAME encoder then try setting it to VBR V 9 (~ 65kbps) or ABR 64 kbps.

Message Edited by Lucky_Luciano on 05-26-2008 08:49 AM

Message Edited by Lucky_Luciano on 05-26-2008 12:23 PM

The very limited range of voice recordings means you can squeeze the beans out of em.  I have podcasts at 16KBPS that sound fine, as long as it’s voice.  Dropping below 64kBPS is the way to go, as memory space is at a premium in the Clip. 

The Audible files I have onboard are at low bitrate, and podcasts are even lower.  Try several different rates, until you are satisfied with the compression / quality ratio.

Bob  :smileyvery-happy:

You’re right about 16Kbps being good enough for voice and only at a fraction of the footprint. I just recently decided to download all the old Sec Now w/ Steve Gibson episodes and I was skepitical downloading low quality versions at this bitrate but they are only 3MB and they sound fine. With 140 odd episodes of this podcast alone, I like that this size is offered. Good enough for VoIP, good enough for podcasts.

Message Edited by hakujin on 05-26-2008 08:23 PM

Thankyou, everyone, for your replies and great information! I will start re-ripping my audio cd’s now…

Revision: I re-ripped a few songs from the original audio CD’s with Roxio mp3 converter. I experimented with 32 kb, 56kb and 64kb bitrate and found the 32kb -56 kb was no good, and 64kb was ok but not great. I don’t know a thing about podcasts, but assume they are a better quality so you can compress at the lower rates. I’m now going to try 80kbs vs 96 to compare. Hopefully i’m doing this correctly… I had no idea there were so many steps to this process of putting books on an mp3 player!  

Message Edited by ekb on 05-27-2008 09:43 PM

It’s the evil of choices:  more choices and more work.  But once you decide what is best for you, it’s all quick after that.  Good job!

Typically, music is encoded at higher rip rates, to capture more of the data in music–it’s complex.  In contrast, audiobooks and podcasts tend to be ripped at lower rip rates, as the human voice alone is less complex. 

It’s the evil of choices:  more choices and more work.  But once you decide what is best for you, it’s all quick after that.  Good job!

 

Typically, music is encoded at higher rip rates, to capture more of the data in music–it can be complex.  In contrast, audiobooks and podcasts tend to be ripped at lower rip rates, as the spoken human voice alone tends to be less complex and fine to understand at lower rip rates.