Can the Fuze do Line-in recording?

Can the Fuze do Line-in recording?   I’ve searched the forum and see nothing about this.

No, there is no line input.

Other than the mic and fm radio, I know of no other way to record on the device.  You’d be surprised at the sound quality of the mic, however, with no background noise, a friend and I actually recorded a few songs that way (just practice/messin’ around, so no reason to bother doing it “correctly”).  As others have said, though, I would love to see a player (hopefully from Sandisk, next-gen View maybe?) fully take advantage of the AS3525 SOC the Fuze and Clip use, as the chip itself has two dedicated line-inputs, as well as 3 outputs (headphone, speaker, line-out), not to mention a wealth of other features.

@jk98 wrote:
No, there is no line input.

Is it known that there is no physical connection between the line-in pins of the AMS 3525 system-on-chip, and the Sansa dock connector?  Has anyone traced the PCBs to figure this out?

From the Sansa Fuze dock connector pinout, I see that there are a large number of pins unaccounted for.  It seems surprising that there are no pins connected to line-in.  (iPods, for example, include line-in on their dock connectors despite the fact that the stock firmware can’t use them… but Rockbox can)

I was wondering the same exact thing, whether the hardware can do it and it’s just the firmware that is holding it back, in which case Rockbox (or a new firmware version) will help, or there’s no connection, and we’ll have to wait for the next-generation device.

I hope we’ll get a suprise answer(as in, “The next firmware update will add Line-In Recording”).:smileyvery-happy:

EDIT: Also, you linked to the wrong player, here is the right one:  Sansa Fuze Pinout

Message Edited by yelped on 06-25-2009 10:58 AM

Message Edited by yelped on 06-25-2009 11:02 AM

@yelped wrote:

I was wondering the same exact thing, whether the hardware can do it and it’s just the firmware that is holding it back, in which case Rockbox (or a new firmware version) will help, or there’s no connection, and we’ll have to wait for the next-generation device.

Yeah, it’d be a silly thing not to include, considering they’re using a SoC with plenty of spare inputs, and a bunch of apparently unused pins on the dock connector.

 

EDIT: Also, you linked to the wrong player, here is the right one:  Sansa Fuze Pinout

Presumably the Fuze and View pinouts are the same insofar as their functionality overlaps.  The e200v1 pinout from Rockbox is nearly the same as the View’s, apparently.  The e200v1 uses a separate Austria Microsystems codec, which also has spare line-ins.

Wouldn’t surprise me if all the Sansas with dock connector have line-in somewhere…

I’m the “newbie” today! - sam-t

Perhaps you can help me  — I know little about MP3 players; but, I want to get one just to play music or record books.  I’d like to be able to download music from both my computer and a CD player - and, I know this latter item would probably require a “line input”.  

Do you have any suggestions for me.  Thank you for your reply. 

Line in is usually used with microphones.  If you just want to add music from a computer or CD, you can transfer the files over your USB port.

"Line in is usually used with microphones. If you just want to add music from a computer or CD, you can transfer the files over your USB port. "

Small inexpensive mics need a microphone jack not a line in. I have not seen any small inexpensive portable mic preams. Most people use a line in to connect the player to a CD player, tape deck, or PA system.

He seems to want to be able to transfer music from a portable CD player to the mp3 player without using a pc. For this a line in is necessary.

Imo if line in recording is necessary, then he should get a device that is primarily a recorder and has a decent line in , like the Zoom H2 or perhaps a more expensive recorder with a line in. He would  get much better results ripping the CDs in a pc though, rather than using a portable CD player and a player or recorder with a line in.

from sam-t …

I want to thank all of you who responded to my question about downloading from a CD.  My son got

us an MP3 player and is helping us learn to use it.  

I appreciate all of your responses very much.  Again, Thanks…

No it doesnt record your voice during a song which would be cool though, it does in an ipod shuffle though.

It appears that the intent of the original question was how to get a CD ‘onto’ the player.

Since you’re new to MP3s and the like, you might want to read the first part of the following and specifically look at the picture at the beginning showing the process   http://www.karbosguide.com/hardware/module7d4.htm

The concept is this:  an audio CD  is ‘ripped’ (its song contents copied and converted) to your PC using the CD drive on your computer, then transferred to your player. This is done by a specialized program called a ‘ripper’ and is possible because unlike a record album which contains an analog recording, the music on a CD is already stored in a high quality digital format. The ‘ripping’ step simply reads and converts/compresses the digital data into a different (usually somewhat lower quality) digital format than the original CD and stores it in a format easily playable on your player or PC.

While performing this ripping operation you choose the exact format and quality of the resultant files. Your player probably plays several formats of files other than ‘mp3’, but often people ‘rip’ to MP3 format. This results in a much smaller file size than the original CD and allows you to put more files on your portable player.

The MP3 format allows you or the ripper program to add ‘tags’ so that while listening you can see the artists name, track and album title and the like.

So you get your CD to the player you ‘rip’ the CD and place the files onto the player. Since  this is done on the computer it can be done quickly and without any cables or the like. 

Search google or your favorite search engine for MP3 basic information and programs that can rip. Most ‘rippers’ are free.

This is simply an introduction in very general terms… so I havent included any particularly technical info.

Message Edited by timn on 03-25-2010 08:03 PM

The link I added above is admittedly not a very good intro to what MP3s are and how to rip and the like

Anyone have any good recommendations for a noob guide for those who don’t know what an MP3 is or how to rip and transfer files?

Things have changed so much in recent years.  It wasn’t that long ago that we had to figure out the line in / line out pairs of cables when adding a cassette deck to the home stereo.  Today, the kids are quite adept at finding music via the Internet.

I still miss the days of leafing through the racks of LPs in the local record shops.

Here’s a copy of the Fuze User Guide.  Have a look at the “adding content” section, beginning with page 18 of the guide (this shows as page 15 at the bottom of the page).  For reference, save the guide on your computer.

If you have music CDs and wish to transfer them to your Sansa, it can be as simple as using Windows Media Player to “rip” the music tracks, converting them to a handy compressed format to take with you.  Windows Media Player will also automatically add the album art, and the required ID3 tag information for you.

The “tag” data is needed to locate your music by album, artist, genre, or song.  As long as you have an Internet connection, Windows Media Player will find the informatin for you.  After getting used to it, there are many alternative ways to convert your music to MP3 or other compatible formats (the Fuze plays quite a few).  It’s up to you to decide which one you like best, and there are quite a few choices.

In a nutshell, once you load the music CD into your PC, you can convert to WMA or MP3, then transfer the music to your player.

Online sources like Rhapsody, Napster, or Amazon, to name but a few, have music available for direct download.

microsansa

And I remember back in '76 when I had

  • a reciever

  • a turntable

  • an external equalizer (I still have it)

  • a 7" reel-to-reel deck

  • a cassette deck

  • 2 giant speakers (5-way with 15" woofers)

but thats off topic :smileyvery-happy:

Message Edited by TomJensen on 05-03-2010 05:57 PM

TomJensen wrote:
What do you use a turning table for?

For eating a square meal on. Whaddya think?

Message Edited by TomJensen on 05-03-2010 05:57 PM

TomJensen wrote:
Oh, I get ya, you mean like buffet style.

Old people they can be pretty smart sometimes.

I’ve heard that too. I’ll let you know if it’s true when I get there.

Message Edited by TomJensen on 05-03-2010 05:58 PM