[Opinion Needed] Voice Record Quality

First of all : HI everybody!

Please i really need an opinion, i want to buy the Fuze but i need to know if the recording quality is good, because i will use it to record university lectures and it is very important to me.

Thank You.

SB

@soviet_bastard wrote:

First of all : HI everybody!

 

Please i really need an opinion, i want to buy the Fuze but i need to know if the recording quality is good, because i will use it to record university lectures and it is very important to me.

 

Thank You.

 

SB

I use mine to record lectures in a small class room and I am never more than 20 feet from the instructor, and it works just fine for me. However others have had issues with the record feature. 

    The recording quality on the Fuze is alot better than it is on most MP3 players, but it doesn’t record in stereo.  One major problem with the voice recording feature is that it only records in WAV format instead of compressed formats such as FLAC or OGG.  You can only get 2 days of voice recording on a 4 GB Fuze.  Hopefully, someday Sandisk will release a firmware update with FLAC/OGG recording capability.  Other than that, the voice recording quality is pretty good.  Unlike most MP3 players, the voice recordings recorded with the Fuze don’t sound like films from the 1930s.

Here are the format details (From the file properties dialog):

Bitrate:  384kbps

Audio Sample Size:  16 bit

Channels:  1 (Mono)

Audio Sample Rate:  24 kHz

Audio Format:  PCM

Message Edited by UltraCody on 04-21-2009 09:12 AM

I recorded a lecture in a large hall (well not that large, sorry I’m not sure), but it wasn’t small.  Could fit maybe 200 people and there were about 70 in attendance.  I had it on my lap (it was only seats).  I got everything the speaker said over the microphone/speakers and a few other things participants said.  It isn’t the best, but I can hear it all.

I’d like to confirm the pretty good recording quality of the Fuze. The noise is quite low for such a cheap device. Therefore you are able to increase the recording level afterwards by using an audio processing software - if necessary at all.

You wouldn’t gain much if you bought a dedicated recording equipment. I’m using a $500 mobile recorder for classical performance recordings. But there I need high dynamic range (24bit), high sampling rate (96kHz), 2 channels, adjustable gain, flat spectral response, etc. - all you don’t need for your lecture recordings. Even with my rather expensive equipment I would try to get high signal to noise by fighting for a good place in the lecture hall, that is as close to the speaker as possible. This ensures good recoding quality, not the extra money.

The microphone sounds great. It picks up everything. The only place not to use it is outside in the wind… duh.

Also, I think it would be a great idea to have the option to save a recording to a microSD card.

you’ve been very kind sharing your thoughts,

thanks everybody, really.