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Highlighted
Newbie
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎01-26-2008

Getting the Evil Brown Box and I have no idea why.

I got my brother an e260 for Christmas and we loaded 25 songs onto it.  13 digitally purchased and 12 ripped form a CD we have owned for years.

 

The player was working fine until last night when my brother brought it down to show me that he was now getting a Synchronize to continue your music subscription message on all of the digital songs.  The ripped songs are still able to play.

 

I plan to connect the device to our computer and simply erase and reload but still, I find it odd that all 25 songs were playing well for nearly six full months and the player should decide to konk out on us now.  His battery strength is down to about half if that might be a factor.

 

It's a problem I believe I can easily fix but has anyone ever heard of this happening before?  I'd like to know how to avoid it in the future.

 

Thanks for all your help

 

Sincerely,

Mary Ellen Byrne

Highlighted
SanDisk Guru
Posts: 2,875
Registered: ‎08-14-2007

Re: Getting the Evil Brown Box and I have no idea why.

Songs purchased online often have DRM (Digital Rights Muck) which restricts your right to play the music you bought.

 

How are you putting songs on the device? Windows Media Player through MTP? Drag-and-drop with MSC? I dunno, Rhapsody? The media players (WMP, Rhapsody) are supposed to transfer keys that allow the DRM songs to play. Somehow, one of those keys has gotten lost or expired. Easiest thing is probably to re-transfer the song from your computer, which should send the keys over again.

 

The longterm solution? Rip your own (without WMP's default copy-protection added) or buy .mp3 files from places like Amazon or eMusic, which don't have DRM. iTunes, Rhapsody and a lot of the others have DRM, which is a ripoff.

 

Read the fine print and see what kind of files you are buying. File formats like .wma and .m4a often have DRM built in. mp3 files don't. 

 

This is one way the music business comitted hara-kiri--by saddling paid songs with DRM, while free pirated versions play for sure.  

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