What are you listening to right now?

Was that Mudstock   or Woodstock?

@marvin_martian wrote:

 


@tapeworm wrote:


@marvin_martian wrote:

 

What do you mean, back when he was good? He’s still good…the new album is excellent!:stuck_out_tongue:

 


Guess I’ll have to give it a listen but up to this point, I prefer his older stuff. Generally though, I’ve found the first (or at least early) albums put out by artists are more about the music and less about the $$. Sadly, it usually reverses at some point, probably due to the record companies insistance. :cry:


 

I will grant you that quite often, that does happen…sadly enough.

 

One thing about Flying In a Blue Dream that I found was, Joe really shouldn’t sing…lol.  I can handle “The Phone Call”, because of how processed the voice is,  but the other songs, he barely sings better than me!:dizzy_face:

That’s the cool thing about music…there really isn’t any ‘right’ or ‘wrong’; just a matter of likes and dislikes.  Personally, I’ve never ever cared too much for Satriani…the only place where I find him the least bit entertaining is in “Chickenfoot”…


Many talented musicians simply can’t make good albums (my opinion only) or they make lousy bandleaders.  But that’s what makes the world go 'round…differing tastes.

Robin Trower - The Playful Heart

“The Turning”

Review

by Robert Taylor
The rise of goth/prog metal seemed to reach a peak at the turn of the century, with an endless supply of bands offering their own spin on the subgenre. Only a handful of these bands seem to have anything interesting or unique to offer, namely Lacuna Coil, Lana Lane, the Gathering, and After Forever, among selected others. With the release of Mother Earth, there was little doubt that the cream of the crop had indeed risen to the top. They refined their approach to feature lead vocalist Sharon den Adel and dumped the growling death metal-style vocals that typify this form of music. The single “Ice Queen” reached number one in both the Netherlands and Belgium and the album itself went gold. Another single, “Our Farewell,” was also released to moderate success. Their music features Celtic and folk influences that contribute to a mature and confident sound that their contemporaries seem to struggle with. Den Adel has that elusive and intangible presence that a great band needs to have from their leader, especially on the live stage. A landmark release that set new standards for creativity, musicianship, and taste – not just for goth/prog metal, but for any style of music. This was easily one of the best releases of 2001.

When Pink Floyd’s “The Wall” first was released, I thought it was complete and utter garbage.  Now, after many years, while I still don’t think it’s particularly good; at least I don’t run out of the room screaming with my fingers plugging my ears.  Played it again last night… the first time in about a decade.  I will probably wait another decade to put it on again. :smileyvery-happy:


El Ten Eleven    (indie band)

@fuze_owner_gb wrote:

“When Pink Floyd’s “The Wall” first was released, I thought it was complete and utter garbage.  Now, after many years, while I still don’t think it’s particularly good; at least I don’t run out of the room screaming with my fingers plugging my ears.  Played it again last night… the first time in about a decade.  I will probably wait another decade to put it on again. :smileyvery-happy:”

 

 

 

So, what do you prefer?  I personally prefer their older stuff than “The Wall.”  A personal favorite is “Shine on You Crazy Diamond” and “Careful With That Axe, Eugene.”

saxmaster765 wrote:

 


fuze_owner-GB wrote:

“When Pink Floyd’s “The Wall” first was released, I thought it was complete and utter garbage.  Now, after many years, while I still don’t think it’s particularly good; at least I don’t run out of the room screaming with my fingers plugging my ears.  Played it again last night… the first time in about a decade.  I will probably wait another decade to put it on again. :smileyvery-happy:”

 

 

 

So, what do you prefer?  I personally prefer their older stuff than “The Wall.”  A personal favorite is “Shine on You Crazy Diamond” and “Careful With That Axe, Eugene.”

 

I always liked “Animals” and thought it never got the attention it was due…everyone talked about Dark Side of the Moon, Wish You were Here, and the Wall the most, but I’ve always listened to Animals more than the Wall. The earlier stuff is occasional listening only these days, now that I am no longer polluting my body with fun stuff anymore.:wink:

Anything other than “The Wall” is decent enough… Not my favorite band by any means, but still worth a spin from time to time.

“Boogie Nights”

I like Animals. It’s a neat album. Currently, I am listening Carmina Burana.

Review

by John Bush

A new album from Massive Attack is an event, even if only one-third of the original group is present for the festivities. Just the group’s fourth album in more than a dozen years, 100th Window marked the departure of Mushroom (permanently, after artistic differences) and Daddy G (temporarily, to raise a family), leaving only one founding member, 3D (Robert del Naja), to muddle along with arranger/producer Neil Davidge (who made his Massive Attack debut on 1998’s Mezzanine). Though Del Naja is mostly successful giving the people what they want – a follow-up to Mezzanine, one of the most compulsive listens of '90s electronica – it unfortunately comes as a sacrifice to the very thing that made Massive Attack so crucial to dance music: their never-ending progression to a radically different sound with each release. For better or worse, 100th Window has the same crushingly oppressive productions, dark, spiralling basslines, and pile-driving beats instantly familiar to fans of Mezzanine. Fortunately, it also has the same depth and point-perfect attention to detail, making for fascinating listening no matter whether the focus is the songs, the effects, or even the percussion lines. Jamaican crooner Horace Andy is back for a pair of tracks (“Everywhen,” “Name Taken”) that nearly equal his features on the last record, while Sinéad O’Connor makes her debut with three vocal features. Unlike Liz Fraser or Tracey Thorn (two Massive Attack muses from the past), O’Connor’s voice lacks resonance and doesn’t reward the close inspection that a Massive Attack production demands. Still, her songwriting is far superior and the slight quaver in her voice adds a much-needed personality to these songs. “A Prayer for England” is a political protest that aligns itself perfectly with the group that coined its name as a satirical nod to military aggression. Another feature for O’Connor, “What Your Soul Sings,” is the only song here that compares to the best Massive Attack has to offer, beginning with a harsh, claustrophobic atmosphere, but soon blossoming like a flower into a beautiful song led by her tremulous voice. In comparison, the four songs for 3D are average at best, mere recyclings of the same ideas heard years earlier. That’s satisfaction enough for those who kept Mezzanine near their stereo for years on end, but a disappointment to those expecting another masterpiece.

Holst: The Planets - Mars and Jupiter

White Witch

“You’re The One”

In honor of “The Loner”, who I just heard died unexpectedly 2 weeks ago at the age of 58. :cry:

Well my firend, you certainly are not alone now. You’re in good company . . . those who like you, left us & this world far too early. Thankfully, your music will live on and enrich many a soul for years to come.

(the picture is like a slap to the eyes, huh?)

Artist - Pink Floyd

Album - Atom Heart Mother

Song - Atom Heart Mother

Amazing… Thats all I gotta say!

Artist  - Hans Zimmer

Album - Inception (soundtrack)

Song - Mombasa