Saving recordings at 48100 sample rate

Is it possible to save recordings from Sansa Clip FM radio at a sample rate of 48100 instead of 24000?

No.

So am I correct in assuming that the resulting wav files are seriously lossy?

Just by being from FM makes them by definition lossy.

@mcblount wrote:
So am I correct in assuming that the resulting wav files are seriously lossy?

Lossless/lossy refers to digital signals.  FM is an analog broadcast, so the idea of being lossless doesn’t really apply.  Your recording is only as good as the FM tuner used to make it.  But for what its worth, FM doesn’t really have high frequencies anyway, so 24khz is probably good enough that higher won’t make much difference.

@saratoga wrote:


@mcblount wrote:
So am I correct in assuming that the resulting wav files are seriously lossy?


 

Lossless/lossy refers to digital signals.  FM is an analog broadcast, so the idea of being lossless doesn’t really apply.  Your recording is only as good as the FM tuner used to make it.  But for what its worth, FM doesn’t really have high frequencies anyway, so 24khz is probably good enough that higher won’t make much difference.

We’re not singing off the same hymn sheet here, I’m talking about a sample rate of 24000 per sec which provides nothing above 12khz frequency wise, so I think the analog signal from the Sansa Clip FM Radio becomes lossy in the conversion to wav which happens when it is saved on the Clip. You can’t burn this wav to CD as it must be at a sample rate of 44,100 per sec, so it must be upsampled first as they say, in something like Adobe Audition.

This of course is of no consequence to the mp3 generation.

@mcblount wrote:


@saratoga wrote:


@mcblount wrote:
So am I correct in assuming that the resulting wav files are seriously lossy?


 

Lossless/lossy refers to digital signals.  FM is an analog broadcast, so the idea of being lossless doesn’t really apply.  Your recording is only as good as the FM tuner used to make it.  But for what its worth, FM doesn’t really have high frequencies anyway, so 24khz is probably good enough that higher won’t make much difference.


 

We’re not singing off the same hymn sheet here, I’m talking about a sample rate of 24000 per sec which provides nothing above 12khz frequency wise, so I think the analog signal from the Sansa Clip FM Radio becomes lossy in the conversion to wav which happens when it is saved on the Clip. You can’t burn this wav to CD as it must be at a sample rate of 44,100 per sec, so it must be upsampled first as they say, in something like Adobe Audition.

 

 

You misunderstand me.  A/D conversion is by definition not lossless (since it involves an analog signal), so asking if the sampling rate makes it lossy doesn’t really make sense.  Its lossy at 10kHz and at 10MHz and at 10GHz and at … :slight_smile:

What you mean to ask is if the sampling rate is high enough for FM radio.  As I said above above, the answer is “probably” since FM radio only uses 15kHz channels, and the effective bandwidth is typically even lower to avoid spilling into adjacent channels.  Thus the limit is probably the quality of the tuner and antenna in practice, and not the low pass filtering in the A/D.

So in short - crap in = crap out!

many thanks

I’ve always associated the term lossy with file compression techniques. A quick look on google seems to confirm this usage. An .mp3 file will lose some of the input information, a .wav file will not. How well the input information prior to saving represents the original source depends on technology used.