Resurrecting Polaroid Film?

When I first read about this, I had trouble believing it. They are serious about this. I could see an eccentric billionaire doing this as a hobby, but can’t see how this can be a profitable venture. Let’s see if they prove me wrong.

http://www.usnews.com/money/personal-finance/articles/2010/02/19/suddenly-instant-photos-are-everywhere.html

It would be helpful when you take photos as a photographer or of your friends when you are out. You snap the Pic print one out for your friend and it stays on your digital camera for you. I think its a good Idea. However what will it cost?  

A battery powered inkjet photo printer seems more practical. There were some digital cameras with a built in printer, however they didn’t seem very popular. I guess either the print quality wasn’t so good, or the cost per print was too high.

It would be nice if digital cameras would have 2 card slots, so at a wedding or other gathering copies of favorite photos can be given to people on an SD card. I am surprised that 1 GB SD cards never really got cheap. I was hoping that 20 packs of them could be available for under $20.

Hey, many of the younger generation have no clue as to the durability and quality of the original Polaroid Land film.  They grew up with a Nintendo, and everything has been “instant gratification” since childhood.

The Polaroid camera offered instant quality prints.  The “SX70” version, the later ones with the thick photograph, and a thick border at the bottom, never pleased my eyes as well as the original “pull-tab” version.  Coincidentally, my mother just sent me a gift, a 1970 Polaroid family photo, color, with my dad holding me on his lap.  My brothers and sisters are all sitting along side, on the couch, with my little sister, the baby, on Mummy’s lap.  The photo has excellent color, and it’s razor sharp.

Polaroids are great with the Hasselblad, as proofs, when setting up a studio shot.  A digital back costs as much as a Porsche in this format.  There’s a handy Polaroid film back for the Hassy.  Running with studio strobes and reflectors, the instant shot is quite helpful.

For legal, evidence applications (forensics), digital can be a tenuous medium, as the integrity of the image can be questioned.  Photographic emulsions are difficult to replicate, much less “doctor”, so they’re useful for evidence needs.

Digital imaging is fun, and it’s improving by leaps and bounds.  The contrast ratio of digital is improving, it’s Achilles’ Heel, in my opinion.  It’s hard to capture those shadow details with digital, and the image blooms out readily, with the color saturation a real pickle to deal with. In low light areas, digital sometimes works well, and at others, the resolution falls drastically.

Bob  :smileyvery-happy:

neutron_bob wrote:

Hey, many of the younger generation have no clue as to the durability and quality of the original Polaroid Land film.  They grew up with a Nintendo, and everything has been “instant gratification” since childhood.

 

The Polaroid camera offered instant quality prints.  The “SX70” version, the later ones with the thick photograph, and a thick border at the bottom, never pleased my eyes as well as the original “pull-tab” version.  Coincidentally, my mother just sent me a gift, a 1970 Polaroid family photo, color, with my dad holding me on his lap.  My brothers and sisters are all sitting along side, on the couch, with my little sister, the baby, on Mummy’s lap.  The photo has excellent color, and it’s razor sharp.

 

Polaroids are great with the Hasselblad, as proofs, when setting up a studio shot.  A digital back costs as much as a Porsche in this format.  There’s a handy Polaroid film back for the Hassy.  Running with studio strobes and reflectors, the instant shot is quite helpful.

 

For legal, evidence applications (forensics), digital can be a tenuous medium, as the integrity of the image can be questioned.  Photographic emulsions are difficult to replicate, much less “doctor”, so they’re useful for evidence needs.

 

Digital imaging is fun, and it’s improving by leaps and bounds.  The contrast ratio of digital is improving, it’s Achilles’ Heel, in my opinion.  It’s hard to capture those shadow details with digital, and the image blooms out readily, with the color saturation a real pickle to deal with. In low light areas, digital sometimes works well, and at others, the resolution falls drastically.

 

Bob  :smileyvery-happy:

 I still work with a Polaroid that was from the late 1970s maybe early 1980s (My Dad bought it new but cant remember when). I use it almsot daily and film is EXPENSIVE infact I have started to have to order from amazon and “Retro Camera” shops.

The original camera, a grey clamshell, collapsible bellows and all, still works beautifully.  The motorized versions had a far shorter lifespan.

Most folks know little about the “Land” name on that camera.  Mr. Land made significant contributions years ago in the development of satellite imagery.  Without it, the Cold War may indeed have grown quite hot.

I was pleased to see the Polaroid name on an HDTV this last weekend.  Times have changed.

Bob  :smileyvery-happy: