Resetting continually req'd; then says "Refreshing Media" & only completes 1/2 the histogram

… - freezes. . . goes blank.    This little piece of Sh*t has been nothing but a hassle.  Not only is the an ongoing problem, but on the RARE occassion I did get it to play, it will only list “A” songs and nothing more.   YEt when I look at the music folder, they’re all there…what’s up, Doc?

Of course, the first thing we need to do is get this puppy to POWER ON, Duhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!!   WTF?!?!?

  1.  Reformat the player, either through its System settings or via your computer (note:  this will erase your content).

  2.  Manually apply/reapply the most recent firmware (see the firmware upgrade sticky thread above).

Not gonna happen.   How do I know the new firmware won’t cause some other problem?    Of course, that doesn’t matter because I cannot get the new firmware LOADED using either of the two options presented to me.

HUNK-A-JUNK being returned, but thanks for you reply.    Keep up the good work.

Would be better if they shipped a quality product in the first place.   Makes me leery of buying ANY SanDisk product in the future.

“Bad! SanDisk!  Bad!”

TMS

If the player is halting halfway through the database refresh, you’ve just located the issue.  If the player is having a hard time parsing a file for access on the device, this is where it will freeze.  There’s a file with album art that’s too large, or the wrong format.  All you need is a straightforward jpg file of 500x500 or less, under 100kb in size.  It’s only going to be displayed on a little screen.

iTunes media is optimized for one family of devices, the iPod.  If anything else is used, Apple could really care less.  You have to be smarter than that little machine, as it’s only a humble few grams of electronics.  Thankfully, correcting your iTunes media is relatively simple, and once it’s done with any one of the many available tools to fix them, the media should play on anything else.  You only have to fix your music once.

On a personal computer, we have a multitude of tools and a much larger processing environment to work with.  This is why the iTunes files seemto play without incident on your computer.  On any portable device, the machine is trying to perform a simple playback task.  It can’t correct glitches like a desktop PC can.  My daughters received a few 'Pods as gifts, they all reverted back to the familiar interface and better sound of their Clips.  I spent hours restarting the little anodized aluminum things when they’d freeze too.

Don’t take a mountain of media and expect it to work all in one go.  Transfers take but a few moments, it’s much better to transfer a few albums at a time, and enjoy the music.

Even a little Ipod isn’t perfect, just try working with one of the earlier generations of the Shuffle.  I especially enjoyed remembering how to tap out Morse Code on the little middle-of-the-cable remote on the teeniest one, I felt as happy as a little boy, remembering the countless hours as a Cub Scout tapping out the Morse code, just to find the next song.

Sorry you’ve had issues with the little machine.  They’re tough little guys, once set up properly, they march on just fine.

Bob  :smileyvery-happy:

Bob mentions a very good point: it just could be a problematic file . . . . My hunch is you won’t want to do this, but you could add your music a bit at a time, until you’re able to isolate he problematic file and then avoid it/see what is up with it. For whatever it’s worth, I’ve never had an issue like yours, in almost 5 years of Clips. But then, almost all of my music comes from CDs that I own and then rip–no quality question there.

Milkman,

Thanks for taking time to reply.  Your hunch is correct.  No can do.  1,000’s of songs to pick from, did so once, have tons showing as being “in-file” and only the A’s and some others will play – after resetting the **bleep** thing every time I want to listen.   I’m sick and tired of having to debug technology for engineers who are either too lazy, or are being forced to release products before they’re ready.   Soon the early adopters in life will stop doing the work of those being paid tons of money to sell us crap.  Consider this choice my own personal one, a vote for Ron Paul if you will, wasted action/decision among the masses of otherwise satisfied customers, but nonetheless my refusal to debug this thing on behalf of Sandisk.  If it encounters a bad file, it should have logic to handle that, not just freeze up like it’s doing.   ALL the songs work perfectly on my archaic iPod that weighs a ton by comparison, and on iTune on my PC.   So instead of falling victim to the claims of “me, too!” vendors and claim the same capability, alas, I find myself as PC biggot going to continue with an ALL APPLE SOLUTION for my music.  To hell with cheap immitators who  can’t and don’t deliver.  The only circumstance under which I will change my mind is to have Sandisk send me a replacement unit they think works, and contact me to walk me through getting my music over to it.  In exchange for that good faith, I will change my rants and raves in their favor about how good their customer service is, that the back their technology and sometimes we get a lemon no matter what.  But, I bet not.  It’s only 50 bucks.  But I get much more per hour for my time, and I cannot waste any more of it on my own; I will only promise to invest it in Sandisk with prior said committment.  TO SANDISK PEOPLE READING THESE FORUMS WHO MIGHT CARE:  you decide!

@tradermansam wrote:

Milkman,

 

Thanks for taking time to reply.  Your hunch is correct.  No can do.  1,000’s of songs to pick from, did so once, have tons showing as being “in-file” and only the A’s and some others will play – after resetting the **bleep** thing every time I want to listen.   I’m sick and tired of having to debug technology for engineers who are either too lazy, or are being forced to release products before they’re ready.   Soon the early adopters in life will stop doing the work of those being paid tons of money to sell us crap.  Consider this choice my own personal one, a vote for Ron Paul if you will, wasted action/decision among the masses of otherwise satisfied customers, but nonetheless my refusal to debug this thing on behalf of Sandisk.  If it encounters a bad file, it should have logic to handle that, not just freeze up like it’s doing.   ALL the songs work perfectly on my archaic iPod that weighs a ton by comparison, and on iTune on my PC.   So instead of falling victim to the claims of “me, too!” vendors and claim the same capability, alas, I find myself as PC biggot going to continue with an ALL APPLE SOLUTION for my music.  To hell with cheap immitators who  can’t and don’t deliver.  The only circumstance under which I will change my mind is to have Sandisk send me a replacement unit they think works, and contact me to walk me through getting my music over to it.  In exchange for that good faith, I will change my rants and raves in their favor about how good their customer service is, that the back their technology and sometimes we get a lemon no matter what.  But, I bet not.  It’s only 50 bucks.  But I get much more per hour for my time, and I cannot waste any more of it on my own; I will only promise to invest it in Sandisk with prior said committment.  TO SANDISK PEOPLE READING THESE FORUMS WHO MIGHT CARE:  you decide!

Absolutely understandable, and I agree with much of what you say.  (And a reason why people seemingly often go to that other company–a certain amount of glitch-free, understandable usability, for which the company is to be commended.)  

I have no idea what goes on behind the scenes at SanDisk–but I’ve said for awhile that, IMHO, some concerted attention should be paid to the Clip software.   Why not throw an engineer or two at it for a month or two, or three–don’t the profits (past, present and future) from the Clip (and Fuze) line justify it?  (In comparison, Rockbox software just seems to get certain of the Clip firmware issues “right.”)  But what do I know.

One thing, though–if you might be expecting SanDisk to be monitoring your posts here and then contacting you, you might want to proceed otherwise.  It could happen, and if so, great!  But better, to assure you get what you need, why not just contact SanDisk yourself and seek help and/or a warranty replacement for your player, which SanDisk has been considerate about.  It’s just a toll-free phone call away . . . .  1-866-SANDISK (726-3475).  

It (in my opinion) is certainly a tag issue. Which maybe can be blamed on SanDisk’s firmware writers (all Sansa players have always been extremely picky about tags), but cannot be blamed on the individual unit itself. This is the way they work, period.

If one’s tags are all in the format the player is looking for, album art (if present) is reasonably sized (and also in the correct format), there are no other anomalies like foreign or strange characters in the tag fields (including umlauts and accent symbols), the Comment field not loaded with garbage (as is the case in many downloaded files), the player will read these tags fine and the database refresh is merely a minor annoyance due to the time it takes to parse all this information.

We hear from people weekly (at least) on this same issue, and have ever since I’ve been around here (4 years).There are countless posts/threads on the various boards here recommending MP3Tag and tips on how to best use it to avoid tag-related problems.

The bottom line is if one is willing to put some effort (and time) in to correct their file’s ID3 tags, they will be rewarded with flawless operation. Granted on large libraries, this might seem an insurmountable task. If they are not able (or willing) though to invest the time and diligence needed to accomplish this, then the player is not going to work properly and those people would probably be better off going with an iPod or something other than the SanDisk line of portable music players.

It (in my opinion) is certainly a tag issue. Which maybe can be blamed on SanDisk’s firmware writers (all Sansa players have always been extremely picky about tags), but cannot be blamed on the individual unit itself. This is the way they work, period.

If one’s tags are all in the format the player is looking for, album art (if present) is reasonably sized (and also in the correct format), there are no other anomalies like foreign or strange characters in the tag fields (including umlauts and accent symbols), the Comment field not loaded with garbage (as is the case in many downloaded files), the player will read these tags fine and the database refresh is merely a minor annoyance due to the time it takes to parse all this information.

We hear from people weekly (at least) on this same issue, and have ever since I’ve been around here (4 years).There are countless posts/threads on the various boards here recommending MP3Tag and tips on how to best use it to avoid tag-related problems.

The bottom line is if one is willing to put some effort (and time) in to correct their file’s ID3 tags, they will be rewarded with flawless operation. Granted on large libraries, this might seem an insurmountable task. If they are not able (or willing) though to invest the time and diligence needed to accomplish this, then the player is not going to work properly and those people would probably be better off going with an iPod or something other than the SanDisk line of portable music players.

I think, again, that Bob and now Tapeworm might be right–a tag issue, which has been known to give the Clips a fit.  

Perhaps an easier way to check the files out:  load them up under MP3Tag (an Internet tag editor freeware) and check them out there–see if something in the tags seems problematic.  And make sure, using MP3Tag, that the ID3 format is set to ID3v2.3 ISO-8859-1 --it could be as simple an issue as simply resaving the files and their tags with that setting being set. 1-2-3, voila–done.  Certainly, I’d check it out, personally.

http://www.mp3tag.de/en/

You can take a few of your music files and check them using almost any ID3 tag editor.  The key is to use the most common tag format, conveniently the default format for Windows Media Player.

Next in line are great suites like Media Monkey and even Winamp, they can write your tags in ID3 v2.3 ISO 8859-1 (Latin-I) format.  A simple problem like having unrecognized characters or album art can cause so much grief.

I use mediainfo  as an add-on to Windows 7.  Checking the media format is automatic.  It pops up as soon as I move the mouse pointer over any media file.

Hey, on one point I strongly agree.   If the Sansa encounters a “bad” file, it should ignore it, or let you know it’s unhappy with the file.  In a perfect world, I would have the device bump these files into a folder labeled “problem files”, or display the file name only with a flag showing it cannot be played.  There are many options open in that regard.  Sure would make troubleshooting easier.

Bob  :stuck_out_tongue: