playlist for files in AUDIOBOOKS folder

So, I’ve been reading all over the forums about how to build playlists that will work with my Clip 4GB.  Seems pretty straightforward.  Or so I thought.

I’m trying to build a playlist for a very long audiobook (~50 hrs, 117 chapters) I downloaded from librivox.org, where it’s one-file-per-chapter.  I put the mp3 files in a folder structure inside AUDIOBOOKS, since that’s what they are.  I was able to create an M3U playlist file for them, and had the playlist file recognized by the Clip, but showed it as empty.  Since I’m a die-hard Linux (and to a lesser extent Mac) user, I had no problem editing the file by hand, and I tried various combinations of relative and absolute paths inside the M3U file (both with and without the leading “” for absolute paths).  The location of the M3U file didn’t seem to matter that much, but apparently the location of the mp3s themselves did.  I couldn’t get anything to show up in the playlist until I moved my media files into the MUSIC folder somewhere, and changed the paths in my M3U appropriately.  Then there were no problems.

I guess what I’m asking is this:  Am I doing something wrong, or is the fact that it wouldn’t recognize playlist member files in the AUDIOBOOKS folder some sort of a limitation of the Clip’s firmware?  Can anyone verify this behavior?

Lloyd

Oh, and since I forgot to say it, this is with Firmware v01.01.29A, which should be the latest.

Lloyd

Its basically a bug.  AudioBook folder doesnt work for Playlists.

A bug, hmm.  If it’s a bug, what are the chances of getting it fixed in a future firmware release?

I suppose the alternative at this point is to concatenate the whole 50 hour book into a single file.  All 1.4 GB or so of it.  Not exactly fun.   Or just put the individual files in the MUSIC folder and use the playlist.  Are there any other workarounds you’d recommend?

Lloyd

The workarounds you suggested are good ones.

We added this to the list for future firmware fixes. 

I just had another epiphany as a possibly-easier workaround, in case anyone else is reading this thread.  The book I was working with (Count of Monte Cristo, by Dumas, if anyone’s interested) from librivox has the book title in each chapter’s album field in the ID3 tag.  The track number fields are all blank, but if I populate them with the chapter numbers as the track numbers, I could play them in sequence, just by selecting the album.  Obviously I have to find a good way to tag all 119 files (117 chapters, but 2 of them have been split into two files each), but other than that, it should be fine.

And it looks like the command-line mp3info tool on my linux machine should do the job, along with some judicious scripting.  But that’s not a big deal.

Thanks again,

Lloyd

Yes, modifying the ID3 tag fields is the simplest and most direct way to control your BIG book.

I was dying to know what was so long.  I enjoy unabridged audiobooks exclusively; as I’m not reading the book myself, why suffer the additional loss of information?

Could it be “War and Peace”?  Alexandre Dumas is a good choice indeed.

The Sansa will list and play your chapters correctly after correcting the tags.

Bob  :smileyvery-happy:

@neutron_bob wrote:

I was dying to know what was so long.  I enjoy unabridged audiobooks exclusively; as I’m not reading the book myself, why suffer the additional loss of information?

 

Could it be “War and Peace”?  Alexandre Dumas is a good choice indeed.

 

Bob  :smileyvery-happy:

I was gonna say Atlas Shrugged…until he mentioned Dumas!

I too demand unabridged audiobooks. I don’t like the idea of having others decide what info I can miss! (And if I’m gonna bother reading/listening to a book…I don’t want to miss anything.

Now if I could just get my audio Bible to jump automatically to the beginning of one book when the current one ends…I’d be a happy camper!

Now you’re talking about a lot of tracks!  Have you found a decent NIV version audiobook?

The NKJV version drives me batty, as we don’t speak in that manner any longer; I find its use a bit pompous, though there are details in the version that can be useful.

Bob  :stuck_out_tongue:

I found a great Audio Bible at the following site:

http://www.listenersbible.com/products/

They have NIV, ESV (which I purchased), and KJV as read by Max McLean. It sounds a bit expensive but it’s well worth it - Max is an excellent reader.

Message Edited by prib81 on 09-10-2008 03:37 PM

@neutron_bob wrote:

Now you’re talking about a lot of tracks!  Have you found a decent NIV version audiobook?

 

The NKJV version drives me batty, as we don’t speak in that manner any longer; I find its use a bit pompous, though there are details in the version that can be useful.

 

Bob  :stuck_out_tongue:

Nawww…I use the old KJV.

The newer translations are like abridged audiobooks…they leave stuff out! :slight_smile:

There are nuggets of wisdom in either version, to be sure.  I have found that using the big desk reference is indispensable, but the dog-eared one gets carried about.

I’ve had a lot of fun listening to audio books, so finding a nice audio version might be worth looking into.

Bob  :wink:

   
once the play lists made(the file with that green arrow) you just click it and can edit the play lists order and content if u wish.

I have seen alot of people ask about how to do this with MTP devices/devices in MTP mode without opening WMP or other programs up, figuared sharing a screenshot would be helpfull’

this is of my fuze, but the YP-U3/YP-T10/p2/p3 and other MTP devices work the same way, its VERY easy.

find the files/folders you want to make play lists for, highlight/slect them> rclick>create playlist>rename new play list.

you can edit the play list by clicking it, a window like below will come up allowing you to add/remove/reorder play list items.

the problem you mention is due to how m3u lists are handled on the clip and fuze, theres a way to get around it, on fuze not sure about clip, but really the above is the easiest method

Message Edited by AzureSky on 09-24-2009 03:30 PM

@neutron_bob wrote:

There are nuggets of wisdom in either version, to be sure.  I have found that using the big desk reference is indispensable, but the dog-eared one gets carried about.

 

I’ve had a lot of fun listening to audio books, so finding a nice audio version might be worth looking into.

 

Bob  :wink:

Years ago I downloaded a shareware program titled “God’s Word for Windows” which came with a variety of public domain translations, and some pared-down material (IIRC, an abridged version of Matthew Henry’s Commentary, Young’s Concordance, and some other fairly orthodox (in the generic sense) materials).

The program was pretty nice, made querys very easy – did more than mere text-matching, and worked pretty nicely.  Took me forever to download (I think it was back in the 2400 baud modem days) and filled up a big folder full of floppies (that I lent to friends to install on their drives).

I don’t know if it’s still available, and unless it’s been updated, it’s a TEXT program rather than an audio system –  but if you’ve got a decent text-to-speech setup, there ya go.