Ogg Conversion

I know nothing about this format, but I’m anxious to hear the sound quality difference. Do I need a special converter and does it require re-ripping cds?

Depends on the software youre using. You could try this one, it accepts a wide range of input formats - for best results a lossless format is required of course.

http://www.rarewares.org/ogg-oggdropxpd.php

Very easy to use also.

Thanks. I’ll give it a whirl.

You can’t convert between two lossy formats (like MP3 or Ogg Vorbis) without additional loss in sound quality.  If you are converting because you want to improve sound quality, you will need to rerip your CDs.  In which case you should consider a lossless format like FLAC.  Once you have lossless files you can convert to as many different formats as you like without additional loss and without ever having to rerip.

to convert your albums, you should prefer a software like this : http://cdexos.sourceforge.net/?q=download

you could automaticaly tag your ogg files with an access to freedb for a quicker rip of your collection

A lot of fuss is made over the quality loss with transcoding, but I’ve heard very little evidence in practical use. Of course, you can’t add quality in the process, so sources for a higher-complexity codec should always be higher bitrates. But going from a higher-bitrate MP3 to a lower-bitrate Ogg may not be different enough from CD ripping (in terms of noticeable quality loss) to warrant re-ripping from CD. It just depends on how valuable a possibly slightly better quality is to you, and how valuable your time is.

That being said, I just re-ripped most of my CDs. It mostly just involves a lot of waiting, so I did it while watching football. I used Quintessential player to rip to Ogg, and it worked except it never put in year or genre tags (it gets tags from Gracenote). I’ve used CDEX in the past to rip to MP3, and it worked well - I’ll try it for some Ogg tonight.

And with cdex, you could also download the aotuv dll files ( http://www.geocities.jp/aoyoume/aotuv/ ) from the last Beta5.5 to have a better quality.

bdb makes a good point.  The higher the bit-rate of the source files, the less noticable the quality loss will be from a transcode.

But again, with a lossless source, you don’t have to make any compromise when transcoding.  I’ve changed my mind several times on the bit-rate I want to use on my Fuze.  And it was just a matter of changing my transcoding preferences in Winamp and letting it resync overnight.  It took months to rip my CD collection and I know going in that I only ever wanted to go through that once, so FLAC was the only choice for me.

Skinjob,

Thanks for your help on the Sansa Firmware Thread.

As discussed, I have my entire CD Collection archived in WAV Format on an External Drive. You have convinced me to re-format using FLAC or OGG for quality and to save space, especially for use on the Fuze.

I am happy with WMP 11, but I see it cannot “easily do” everything I want relative to reformatting to FLAC. You suggested that I look at WINAMP to accomplish this on the fly so as to permit tagging and the FLAC encoding of my Wav Files. 

Do I need to purchase the Pro Version and are there any conflicts between WMP 11 and WINAMP when using both on the same machine?

Would I be better off using WMP 11, then using a separate Tagging App. and Trans-Coder Application to accomplish the same end goal?

I also have some old vinyl that I will be doing as well. 

Thanks! 

@bdb wrote:

A lot of fuss is made over the quality loss with transcoding, but I’ve heard very little evidence in practical use. Of course, you can’t add quality in the process, so sources for a higher-complexity codec should always be higher bitrates. But going from a higher-bitrate MP3 to a lower-bitrate Ogg may not be different enough from CD ripping (in terms of noticeable quality loss) to warrant re-ripping from CD. It just depends on how valuable a possibly slightly better quality is to you, and how valuable your time is.

 

That being said, I just re-ripped most of my CDs. It mostly just involves a lot of waiting, so I did it while watching football. I used Quintessential player to rip to Ogg, and it worked except it never put in year or genre tags (it gets tags from Gracenote). I’ve used CDEX in the past to rip to MP3, and it worked well - I’ll try it for some Ogg tonight.

The OP said he wanted to hear the sound quality difference between formats. That will be impossible to do by transcoding. The only way to hear any difference is to rip the same source file into the two formats to be compared.

It’s a different issue, but transcoding between lossy formats always results in quality deterioration. Whether an individual notices or can live with the differences might be debatable, but it’s not something I’d recommend.

@hl4268 wrote:

Do I need to purchase the Pro Version and are there any conflicts between WMP 11 and WINAMP when using both on the same machine?

 

Would I be better off using WMP 11, then using a separate Tagging App. and Trans-Coder Application to accomplish the same end goal? 

Winamp Pro only adds two things over the free version:

  1. Faster burning & ripping.  The free version is throttled to a slow speed (I think around 4x).  Pro will burn and rip at 48x.
  2. MP3 encoding.  The free version can play MP3, but you need Pro to create MP3s.

For your usage scenario, I think you would want the Pro version.  And actually $20 is really cheap for all the functionality Winamp brings to the table.

There is a conflict between WMP11 and Winamp in MTP mode.  In MSC mode there is no conflict.  Since you are using WAVs and presumably don’t have any DRM protected files, you would probably want to use MSC mode anyway.  I use Winamp with my Fuze and Clip in MSC mode exclusively.

Whether you use Winamp or not, almost anything is better than WMP.  I think Winamp is the best all-in-one solution.  It provides a huge amount of functionality while still maintaining simplicity and usability.  There are other excellent player/media manager tools like MediaMonkey and foobar that you might want to consider.  MediaMonkey in particular is very powerful and can do a lot of things that Winamp can’t, but I just prefer the simplicity and customizability of Winamp’s UI.

And regardless of what media manager you use, you will still need a good tagging tool like MP3Tag or Tag&Rename.  All media managers have tagging features for routine tag maintenance, but when it comes to big tagging tasks (like tagging your whole library from file names), you’re going to need a purpose-built tagging tool.  Note that despite the name, MP3Tag supports pretty much every file format (FLAC & Ogg included).  It’s probably the best free tagging tool available.

For a simple do-it-all solution, I would recommend Winamp for ripping, playing, syncing, transcoding, burning and simple tag maintenance.  Then add MP3Tag for any tag heavy lifting.  Once you’re comfortable with all that functionality, you could look at branching out to special purpose apps that do certain things better than Winamp.

You understand precisely what I want to do.

Thanks for that complete rundown. I will put down the $20 Bucks and go for WINAMP Pro and download the MP3 Tags App. I do want something simple. Once I get the WAV Archive Library converted I will be in good shape.

Thanks Much!