New Device Found Using 32GB µSDHC SanDisk Card

Ah, my search is complete.  This upgraded TARDIS (police box) uses the 32GB device.  Note the upgraded camera.

Cheers!

Bob  :smileyvery-happy:

I’m both amused and confused.

It’s a reference to the popular English science fiction show “Doctor Who”.  He would travel through space and time using the TARDIS, a classic Police telephone box (blue) as compared to the public (red) phone box.

The ides behind the TARDIS ( T ime A nd R elative D imension(s) I n S pace)  was that though the space was small from the outside, the thing was voluminous on the inside.

 

The sets used for the television show were quite interesting.  If you had viewed the thing for the first time, once he went inside the wee box, you had to scratch your head.

The 32GB µSD_HC_ card reminds me of the concept: voluminous space in a physically small card.  Then, seeing cameras affixed to this new one, I couldn’t resist.

Bob  :smileyvery-happy:

I got the “Doctor Who” reference (I’ve seen almost every episode of the updated series), that’s the part that amused me. I just didn’t see where the microsdhc card fit in.

@neutron_bob wrote:

 

The 32GB µSD_HC_ card reminds me of the concept: voluminous space in a physically small card.  Then, seeing cameras affixed to this new one, I couldn’t resist.

 

Bob  :smileyvery-happy:

 

Okay, I get it now. I’m a bit oblivious sometimes. Of course, having to have it explained reduces the funny, but that’s not your fault. It’s the nature of humor.

I need a 32GB microsdhc right away…I’m at 21.5GB of music…still not up to 4,120 files though…lolMusic

Not to worry, the team’s working on the file limitation.  I’m looking forward to using the 32GB for high resolution audio (FLAC) and video.  With 32GB, that camera on the phone box has room for recordings.

Bob  :smileyvery-happy:

this january, at CES 2009, SD Association announces SDXC (eXtended Capacity), the next generation of SDHC and microSDHC, from 64GB up to 2TB…

http://www.sdcard.org/developers/tech/sdxc

:dizzy_face:

It’s SDXC and MicroSDXC.

Nice to see that technology is moving forward, but those cards (when they become available) won’t be compatible with the currect line of Sansa players, & so is probably of limited interest to most people here.

They will require the next generation of SanDisk portable audio players, if there are any. See, even as some now are just discovering the Fuze or Clip for the first time, these products are already on the downward slope toward obsolesence.

Whether they will be replaced by something bigger, bolder, latest & greatest probably depends a great deal on how this global-wide recession pans out and how long it takes. You know it’s bad when Apple is forced to lay off employees in order to show a profit and pacify their shareholders. The only one that seems to be making any serious coin during all this is Netflix.

These cards & SanDisk’s latest offerings, the SlotMusic & SlotRadio players (both low-end models with no on-board memory at all & very few features) may signal the shape of things to come, at least from SanDisk. It seems they (SanDisk) are becoming more interested in growing their core business of flash memory and less interested in developing products that will use & showcase this larger memory capacity, leaving that to others like cell phone & PDA manufacturers.

The fact that we’ve seen 2 ‘toys’ in a row come out from SanDisk without any hint to a higher-end audio and/or video player suggests that if they (SanDisk) indeed have anything else up their sleeves or waiting in the wings, it’s going to be more of the same; crappy $20 units marketed toward kids and aged ‘techno-phobes’. Nothing for the audiophile and/or techno-savvy user.

Sadly, it appears as though the Fuze may go down in history as the last ‘good’ player SanDisk made. And even that distinction is jaded by the problem-laden Rev. 2 device & the way it’s release and firmware updates were handled (or not). I seriously hope I’m wrong, but that the way the ‘writing on the wall’ is reading from my angle. :cry:

Nice to see that technology is moving forward, but those cards (when they become available) won’t be compatible with the currect line of Sansa players, & so is probably of limited interest to most people here.

They will require the next generation of SanDisk portable audio players, if there are any. See, even as some now are just discovering the Fuze or Clip for the first time, these products are already on the downward slope toward obsolesence.

Whether they will be replaced by something bigger, bolder, latest & greatest probably depends a great deal on how this global-wide recession pans out and how long it takes. You know it’s bad when Apple is forced to lay off employees in order to show a profit and pacify their shareholders. The only one that seems to be making any serious coin during all this is Netflix.

These cards & SanDisk’s latest offerings, the SlotMusic & SlotRadio players (both low-end models with no on-board memory at all & very few features) may signal the shape of things to come, at least from SanDisk. It seems they (SanDisk) are becoming more interested in growing their core business of flash memory and less interested in developing products that will use & showcase this larger memory capacity, leaving that to others like cell phone & PDA manufacturers.

The fact that we’ve seen 2 ‘toys’ in a row come out from SanDisk without any hint to a higher-end audio and/or video player suggests that if they (SanDisk) indeed have anything else up their sleeves or waiting in the wings, it’s going to be more of the same; crappy $20 units marketed toward kids and aged ‘techno-phobes’. Nothing for the audiophile and/or techno-savvy user.

Sadly, it appears as though the Fuze may go down in history as the last ‘good’ player SanDisk made. And even that distinction is jaded by the problem-laden Rev. 2 device & the way it’s release and firmware updates were handled (or not). I seriously hope I’m wrong, but that’s the way the ‘writing on the wall’ is reading from my angle. :cry:

Nice to see that technology is moving forward, but those cards (when they become available) won’t be compatible with the currect line of Sansa players, & so is probably of limited interest to most people here.

They will require the next generation of SanDisk portable audio players, if there are any. See, even as some now are just discovering the Fuze or Clip for the first time, these products are already on the downward slope toward obsolesence.

Whether they will be replaced by something bigger, bolder, latest & greatest probably depends a great deal on how this global-wide recession pans out and how long it takes. You know it’s bad when Apple is forced to lay off employees in order to show a profit and pacify their shareholders. The only one that seems to be making any serious coin during all this is Netflix.

These cards & SanDisk’s latest offerings, the SlotMusic & SlotRadio players (both low-end models with no on-board memory at all & very few features) may signal the shape of things to come, at least from SanDisk. It seems they (SanDisk) are becoming more interested in growing their core business of flash memory and less interested in developing products that will use & showcase this larger memory capacity, leaving that to others like cell phone & PDA manufacturers.

The fact that we’ve seen 2 ‘toys’ in a row come out from SanDisk without any hint to a higher-end audio and/or video player suggests that if they (SanDisk) indeed have anything else up their sleeves or waiting in the wings, it’s going to be more of the same; crappy $20 units marketed toward kids and aged ‘techno-phobes’. Nothing for the audiophile and/or techno-savvy user.

Sadly, it appears as though the Fuze may go down in history as the last ‘good’ player SanDisk made. And even that distinction is jaded by the problem-laden Rev. 2 device & the way it’s release and firmware updates were handled (or not). I seriously hope I’m wrong, but that’s the way the ‘writing on the wall’ is reading from my angle. :cry:

Agreed…the Slotmusic and SlotRadio were a backwards step. The Clip, Fuze, and (from what I hear) e-series are wonderful, so why aren’t they moving forwards? Mystifying, at best, these so-called “new products” they’re choosing to introduce, when the world want upgrades on the 3 aforementioned players. It’s almost like a certain former “chief executive” had taken over the company…:stuck_out_tongue:

I would think a simple firmware upgrade would make the new cards compatable.

@lewislink wrote:
I would think a simple firmware upgrade would make the new cards compatable.

Maybe so, but just as SD and SDHC are completely different formats and an e200 seriesv1 can read SD, but not SDHC, I assume SDXC will be just as different from SDHC and require different hardware to take advantage of it.

It’s true that the Rockbox developers figured out how to get the v1’s to read the SDHC cards, and that proved that it could be done, but at the same time the fact the SanDisk elected not to do it also suggests that they probably won’t be inclined to with the Fuze platform either.

Certainly there are egg-heads out there who will know the reasons behind why it would, or would not work. I am definitely not one of those. I’m merely drawing conclusions based on previous history. SanDisk I think, will either see this as an opportunity to introduce a completely new model line of players, or abolish their portable audio player division altogether and let another manufacturer have their market share, concentrating & focusing their attention on their core business, flash memory cards.

They have shown they are not interested in competing with, or trying to surpass the high-end competitor’s players with their recent introduction of their ‘toy’ line, the SlotMusic & SlotRadio players which do nothing except support their foray into pre-recorded music on their memory cards. Something I think will go the way of the 8-track tape players & Dodo birds, only a lot more quickly.

Yeah, I can see that being the case.

@tapeworm wrote:

Maybe so, but just as SD and SDHC are completely different formats and an e200 seriesv1 can read SD, but not SDHC, I assume SDXC will be just as different from SDHC and require different hardware to take advantage of it.

 

It’s true that the Rockbox developers figured out how to get the v1’s to read the SDHC cards, and that proved that it could be done, but at the same time the fact the SanDisk elected not to do it also suggests that they probably won’t be inclined to with the Fuze platform either.

 

Certainly there are egg-heads out there who will know the reasons behind why it would, or would not work. I am definitely not one of those. I’m merely drawing conclusions based on previous history. SanDisk I think, will either see this as an opportunity to introduce a completely new model line of players, or abolish their portable audio player division altogether and let another manufacturer have their market share, concentrating & focusing their attention on their core business, flash memory cards.

Actually…I see the Slot Music business as a good move. If it catches on, it will force all the other DAP makers to incorporate MicroSD slot into their DAPs. And that is never a bad thing…being able to expand memory capacity. And when and if this happens, Sandisk will be sitting pretty whith the other DAP makers somehow having to license Slot Music or enjoying the extra sales of MicroSDs because of the inclusion of slots on these other brand DAPs.

@tapeworm wrote:

They have shown they are not interested in competing with, or trying to surpass the high-end competitor’s players with their recent introduction of their ‘toy’ line, the SlotMusic & SlotRadio players which do nothing except support their foray into pre-recorded music on their memory cards. Something I think will go the way of the 8-track tape players & Dodo birds, only a lot more quickly.

Message Edited by lewislink on 04-25-2009 02:24 PM

@lewislink wrote:

 

Actually…I see the Slot Music business as a good move. If it catches on, it will force all the other DAP makers to incorporate MicroSD slot into their DAPs. And that is never a bad thing…being able to expand memory capacity. And when and if this happens, Sandisk will be sitting pretty whith the other DAP makers somehow having to license Slot Music or enjoying the extra sales of MicroSDs because of the inclusion of slots on these other brand DAPs.

Maybe we see it differently, but I think that’s an awful big IF. Personally, I don’t think it will catch on; especially with the limited promotion and/or advertising (or lack of) it’s receiving.

I do agree however, that other DAP manufacturers are missing the boat if they don’t incoroprate a MicroSD slot into their players. This is just a win-win-win stiuation (SanDisk, other DAP company, consumer) no matter how you look at it.

I don’t agree though, that IF it catches on, it will force this MicroSD slot acceptance and incorporation into every other player on the market. Certainly Apple won’t do it, if for no other reason than they didn’t come up with it in the first place. And most other companies tend to follow Apple’s lead in this field. That’s why so many of them are mediocre and operate similarly.

And even if we consider and assume that all other competitor’s players  DO have a MicroSD slot . . . that doesn’t guarantee the SlotMusic or SlotRadio card success. People would still have to want to buy them. The same price as a CD as for a SlotMusic card? With no album art or liner with information and/or lyrics and comments by or about the artist? No, this is going to have to change before the general public will accept this. You don’t see the same prices for on-line albums as CD’s, do you? No, they generally about 10 bucks instead of $15 (and even at that price, I think it’s a rip-off). A SlotMusic card doesn’t give you virtually anything more than a downloaded album. It’s still a compressed lossy format, it still does not give you any album or CD liner to look at or read, and it’s 1/2 the physical size of a postage stamp, as opposed to a CD & jewel case that you can hold in your hand and know there’s something there and the sound quality is top-notch.

And $40 for the SlotRadio ‘pig-in-the-poke’ card? The time I blow that much money on a fingernail-size card full of music that I didn’t pick and that I have limited selection of, and what selections there are is half full of artist or genres that I don’t care for, and all that music is still a compressed lossy format that I have no control over, is the time to strap me in one of those white coats with the really long arms that wrap around and strap me down and give me the same treatment as they gave Jack Nicholson in ‘One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest’. Then just feed me some pablum a couple times a day and all you’ll hear out of me is a low, barely audible mumble.

Sure, there’s always going to be some people with whom all this doesn’t matter and that have more dollars than sense, but those are the i-sheep supporting Apple. Everyone else knows better.

There’s just one thing to consider, though. The vast majority of DAP user don’t think like we do, nor care to immerse themselves into the scene. They just want their music as quickly and easily as possible And loading a MicroSD card already full of the music they want to hear into their Slot Music, Slot Radio or MicroSD incorporated DAP is the ticket for them. They can pop into a Best Buy, snag some Metallica and snap it in and be listening immediately. Try that with a CD. First, the CD player is nowhere near as mainstream as the DAP is. So the likelyhood that people with immediate needs will be carrying a CD player with them is much slimmer.

It’s all about instant gratification. Nobody wants to wait to load their new CD onto the PC, convert it and load the files onto their DAP and then get back to that scene they left when the need arose for that particular music and hope the flame is still burning.

Well, you may have a point there. I wasn’t suggesting that people still carried around CD ‘Walkmans’, but rather just about everyone alive into music at any level owns CD’s and also in today’s world virtually everyone owns a PC (or Mac). So it is safe to assume that one would prefer to rip that CD they already own into .mp3 format and transfer it to the portable audio device of their choosing for music at the ready and on the go.

This, I think encompasses the vast majority. The lazy, instant gratification generation who prefers convenience over quality and doesn’t care about the expense, I would hope would be in the minority. Such short-sidedness is is very dangerous when you consider these are the same people who could & will someday be running companies & governments of the world. Wow!

You could be right however. I’ve been known to be wrong before. I have only one thing to say to those who you describe:

“Bahh, Baaaaaa bah baaaahhhhhh baa baaa ba bahhhh baaaaah baa baa bahhh.”

Which translates to, “The Apple store is down the street & on your left, you poser.” :smileyvery-happy:

LOL…it’s like a crap. You go to the closest kiosk you can find…you make the donation and in return receive reward.

It makes sense to me that there are two different markets … one for kids and technophobes, and one for the rest.

SDXC support, for example … I have to wonder, what IS the average size of the non-technophile’s MP3 collection?  I’m guessing it’s quite a bit under 32GB.  So larger formats are for those people who have an “abnormally” large amount of music, or want to carry a lot of video around with them, or like to encode their music in space-consuming formats (WAV anyone?).

So Sandisk looks at the market, and puts its efforts where the $ is.

Message Edited by PromisedPlanet on 05-03-2009 09:03 AM