I DESPISE WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER

I love the clip+.  It does almost everything I want.  Windows Media Player makes me want to kill myself.  It is the most frustrating, ridiculous program.  In my library, I check columns I want to view but they never show up.  I can’t delete playlists that have somehow mysteriously appeared on my external sd card sync window.  I can’t sort by disc #.  The interface is cumbersome and not intuitive.  I feel like an idiot when I use it.  I feel like whoever wrote the program is a jackass.  I feel whoever wrote it probably doesnt even use it and uses iTunes instead.  If I could, I would **bleep**ing use iTunes in a heartbeat.  If you can’t tell I’m a little frustrated.  I basically think the writer of Windows Media Player should be drawn, quartered, waterboarded and whatever they did to William Wallace at the end of Braveheart, just slower.  This coming from someone who doesn’t believe in torture.

Please take some time to read the rules and guidelines and lets keep the language clean.

 

Forum Admin

slotmonsta  

Message Edited by slotmonsta on 03-01-2010 08:40 AM

Message Edited by slotmonsta on 03-01-2010 08:43 AM

joopitur wrote:
I love the clip+.  It does almost everything I want.  Windows Media Player makes me want to kill myself.  It is the most frustrating, ridiculous program.  In my library, I check columns I want to view but they never show up.  I can’t delete playlists that have somehow mysteriously appeared on my external sd card sync window.  I can’t sort by disc #.  The interface is cumbersome and not intuitive.  I feel like an idiot when I use it.  I feel like whoever wrote the program is a jackass.  I feel whoever wrote it probably doesnt even use it and uses iTunes instead.  If I could, I would **bleep**ing use iTunes in a heartbeat.  If you can’t tell I’m a little frustrated.  I basically think the writer of Windows Media Player should be drawn, quartered, waterboarded and whatever they did to William Wallace at the end of Braveheart, just slower.  This coming from someone who doesn’t believe in torture.

You know, you don’t have to use it…there are alternatives, like MediaMonkey, WinAmp, and J. River Media Jukebox…or you have the option to use no program at all. Why you would want to use iTunes is beyond me though.:wink:

Message Edited by slotmonsta on 03-01-2010 08:40 AM

Message Edited by slotmonsta on 03-01-2010 08:42 AM

WMP is an extremely capable program. Like most MS software, you have to learn how to use it. Start out by telling us what version you are using (Windows 7 version is commonly called 12).

A couple things to bear in mind—your “library” in WMP is local to your computer. You tell WMP where to find music (or whatever) and it builds a local library. If, for example, you are watching a folder for your library on a network share, you have to add that to the “watched folders” list on EVERY computer on your network—otherwise that music will not show up in your library. Often (before Win7), changes to tags for files are local only. If you change a genre of an album, it only changes your local library. This is good and bad—if you screw up, over-write good info with bad, only your library is screwed up, not the actual song tags. In Windows 7, this is somewhat different as all media, docs, etc. uses “libraries”, which are virtual collections of folders, similar to “watched folders” in earlier WMP versions. This is actually simple, but you have to understand how it works and why they set it up this way (actually very beneficial, overall).  Regarding columns to appear in WMP, this sounds like a local issue. I have never had this problem on any computer with any version of WMP (going way back). Something seems wrong locally.

regarding playlists appearing by themselves—it sounds like you set up a sync relationship with WMP. Go back to your device (SD card or whatever) and disable the sync relationsip (right click). Sync relationship sets up auto-sync, and does this via playlists. You sound like you want to drag stuff over the the device and do manual sync (I do—auto sync is something I never want–iTunes has something like that, too). You DO NOT need to set up a sync relationship—that is ONLY for automatically syncing your device every time you connect it. Convenient for some, apparently, but not me (or you, it seems).

Message Edited by slotmonsta on 03-01-2010 08:41 AM

Message Edited by slotmonsta on 03-01-2010 08:42 AM

@mikem132 wrote:

WMP is an extremely capable program. Like most MS software, you have to learn how to use it. Start out by telling us what version you are using (Windows 7 version is commonly called 12).

A couple things to bear in mind—your “library” in WMP is local to your computer. You tell WMP where to find music (or whatever) and it builds a local library. If, for example, you are watching a folder for your library on a network share, you have to add that to the “watched folders” list on EVERY computer on your network—otherwise that music will not show up in your library. Often (before Win7), changes to tags for files are local only. If you change a genre of an album, it only changes your local library. This is good and bad—if you screw up, over-write good info with bad, only your library is screwed up, not the actual song tags. In Windows 7, this is somewhat different as all media, docs, etc. uses “libraries”, which are virtual collections of folders, similar to “watched folders” in earlier WMP versions. This is actually simple, but you have to understand how it works and why they set it up this way (actually very beneficial, overall).  Regarding columns to appear in WMP, this sounds like a local issue. I have never had this problem on any computer with any version of WMP (going way back). Something seems wrong locally.

regarding playlists appearing by themselves—it sounds like you set up a sync relationship with WMP. Go back to your device (SD card or whatever) and disable the sync relationsip (right click). Sync relationship sets up auto-sync, and does this via playlists. You sound like you want to drag stuff over the the device and do manual sync (I do—auto sync is something I never want–iTunes has something like that, too). You DO NOT need to set up a sync relationship—that is ONLY for automatically syncing your device every time you connect it. Convenient for some, apparently, but not me (or you, it seems).

That’s the funniest thing I’ve read in months.  I’m no Microsoft basher; in fact, I’m a former employee… But WMP has got to be one of the lousiest pieces of software ever created.  Some of my former associates still comment how lousy it is.  So, if former Microsoft employees think it’s junk, what is the common consumer supposed to think?  I don’t care in the least if someone wants to use it, but there are far superior options out there, why bother?

Message Edited by fuze_owner-GB on 02-28-2010 11:40 AM

Message Edited by slotmonsta on 03-01-2010 08:42 AM

fuze_owner-GB wrote:


@mikem132 wrote:

WMP is an extremely capable program. Like most MS software, you have to learn how to use it. Start out by telling us what version you are using (Windows 7 version is commonly called 12).

A couple things to bear in mind—your “library” in WMP is local to your computer. You tell WMP where to find music (or whatever) and it builds a local library. If, for example, you are watching a folder for your library on a network share, you have to add that to the “watched folders” list on EVERY computer on your network—otherwise that music will not show up in your library. Often (before Win7), changes to tags for files are local only. If you change a genre of an album, it only changes your local library. This is good and bad—if you screw up, over-write good info with bad, only your library is screwed up, not the actual song tags. In Windows 7, this is somewhat different as all media, docs, etc. uses “libraries”, which are virtual collections of folders, similar to “watched folders” in earlier WMP versions. This is actually simple, but you have to understand how it works and why they set it up this way (actually very beneficial, overall).  Regarding columns to appear in WMP, this sounds like a local issue. I have never had this problem on any computer with any version of WMP (going way back). Something seems wrong locally.

regarding playlists appearing by themselves—it sounds like you set up a sync relationship with WMP. Go back to your device (SD card or whatever) and disable the sync relationsip (right click). Sync relationship sets up auto-sync, and does this via playlists. You sound like you want to drag stuff over the the device and do manual sync (I do—auto sync is something I never want–iTunes has

something like that, too). You DO NOT need to set up a sync relationship—that is ONLY for automatically syncing your device every time you connect it. Convenient for some, apparently, but not me (or you, it seems).


That’s the funniest thing I’ve read in months.  I’m no Microsoft basher; in fact, I’m a former employee… But WMP has got to be one of the lousiest pieces of software ever created.  Some of my former associates still comment how lousy it is.  So, if former Microsoft employees think it’s junk, what is the common consumer supposed to think?  I don’t care in the least if someone wants to use it, but there are far superior options out there, why bother?

Message Edited by fuze_owner-GB on 02-28-2010 11:40 AM

 It is capable. Its capable in the same way you are capable of going to the moon. It plays Music, it rips Cds, and it burns disks. In the sense that at its most basic its capable then yeah. But I agree that there are better options. 

Message Edited by slotmonsta on 03-01-2010 08:43 AM

@conversionbox wrote:


 It is capable. Its capable in the same way you are capable of going to the moon. It plays Music, it rips Cds, and it burns disks. In the sense that at its most basic its capable then yeah. But I agree that there are better options. 

 

Of course you are right; it is capable; just not very fun to use.  I’d rather stick my eyes with 1000 pins than to use it; but that’s just my view.  I’m sure there has got to be somebody that likes it…:smileyvery-happy:

Message Edited by fuze_owner-GB on 02-28-2010 02:07 PM

Message Edited by slotmonsta on 03-01-2010 08:43 AM

Even WMP12 is inferior. I use it to watch videos, but there are only two that will show up in its folder view of its supposed video library, although there are more than that on my hard drive. I have to click on them in Explorer to get WMP12 to play them. The only thing it does without issue is play DVD’s. I don’t use it for audio…I have MediaMonkey Gold for that.:stuck_out_tongue:

Message Edited by slotmonsta on 03-01-2010 08:44 AM

I’m curious what you are looking for in a media player that WMP does not do? I play, rip, tag, burn, organize, sync, update tag info and more very easily. I tried WinAmp long ago and found pretty much nothing it did that WMP did not do, so I don’t use it anymore (I don’t like basically duplicate programs on my computer). I have not found any program that updates id3 tags easier than WMP. If you are trying to rip into some niche format like FLAC or something, then maybe you have a point. I don’t–I just rip to 192kbs mp3 files in WMP12. My thought is that I have a high quality “master” file anyway, and I am only ripping music for portability, so I don’t want a huge file.

I am open to better solutions for what I am doing, but I have no desire for anything other than generally basic functions.

I will mention a couple items I have found that I would like that I have not found a smooth way for WMP to accomplish:

  1. tagging multi-disc albums (WMP12 seems to be able to do this, but I have not really worked with this much yet)

  2. creating an alpha-numeric file list for a pseudo playlist (I have a Zen Nano player that cannot play actual playlists–Creative had a program long ago that would append a prefix on a file name based upon where within a file you dragged a song—creating a “sort of” playlist)

  3. any quality options in ripping an mp3 file (such as volume levelling, etc.)\

  4. convert files ripped in wma to mp3

This post is not meant to be argumentative. If there are better options available (free) I am all ears. As I said, I’ve only used a couple over the years and that was long ago (stuff like WinAmp and CDex).

Message Edited by mikem132 on 03-01-2010 05:24 AM

Message Edited by slotmonsta on 03-01-2010 08:44 AM

@mikem132 wrote:

I’m curious what you are looking for in a media player that WMP does not do? I play, rip, tag, burn, organize, sync, update tag info and more very easily. I tried WinAmp long ago and found pretty much nothing it did that WMP did not do, so I don’t use it anymore (I don’t like basically duplicate programs on my computer). I have not found any program that updates id3 tags easier than WMP. If you are trying to rip into some niche format like FLAC or something, then maybe you have a point. I don’t–I just rip to 192kbs mp3 files in WMP12. My thought is that I have a high quality “master” file anyway, and I am only ripping music for portability, so I don’t want a huge file.

I am open to better solutions for what I am doing, but I have no desire for anything other than generally basic functions.

I will mention a couple items I have found that I would like that I have not found a smooth way for WMP to accomplish:

  1. tagging multi-disc albums (WMP12 seems to be able to do this, but I have not really worked with this much yet)
  1. creating an alpha-numeric file list for a pseudo playlist (I have a Zen Nano player that cannot play actual playlists–Creative had a program long ago that would append a prefix on a file name based upon where within a file you dragged a song—creating a “sort of” playlist)
  1. any quality options in ripping an mp3 file (such as volume levelling, etc.)\
  1. convert files ripped in wma to mp3

This post is not meant to be argumentative. If there are better options available (free) I am all ears. As I said, I’ve only used a couple over the years and that was long ago (stuff like WinAmp and CDex).

Message Edited by mikem132 on 03-01-2010 05:24 AM

For one, and most importantly, the mp3 engine in WMP is out of date; and last time I looked (admittedly a while ago) it didn’t support VBR encoding.  For me FLAC support is essential; and is NOT a niche format.  Almost all the audiophiles I hang around use that format as a means to save their CD collections to a lossless format; then it’s an easy task to convert to the lossy codec of choice.

That’s great that you find WMP suits your needs.  I just know it isn’t for me.  No one program is going to be right for everybody.

Message Edited by slotmonsta on 03-01-2010 08:44 AM

fuze_owner-GB wrote:


@mikem132 wrote:

I’m curious what you are looking for in a media player that WMP does not do? I play, rip, tag, burn, organize, sync, update tag info and more very easily. I tried WinAmp long ago and found pretty much nothing it did that WMP did not do, so I don’t use it anymore (I don’t like basically duplicate programs on my computer). I have not found any program that updates id3 tags easier than WMP. If you are trying to rip into some niche format like FLAC or something, then maybe you have a point. I don’t–I just rip to 192kbs mp3 files in WMP12. My thought is that I have a high quality “master” file anyway, and I am only ripping music for portability, so I don’t want a huge file.

I am open to better solutions for what I am doing, but I have no desire for anything other than generally basic functions.

I will mention a couple items I have found that I would like that I have not found a smooth way for WMP to accomplish:

  1. tagging multi-disc albums (WMP12 seems to be able to do this, but I have not really worked with this much yet)

  2. creating an alpha-numeric file list for a pseudo playlist (I have a Zen Nano player that cannot play actual playlists–Creative had a program long ago that would append a prefix on a file name based upon where within a file you dragged a song—creating a “sort of” playlist)

  3. any quality options in ripping an mp3 file (such as volume levelling, etc.)\

  4. convert files ripped in wma to mp3

This post is not meant to be argumentative. If there are better options available (free) I am all ears. As I said, I’ve only used a couple over the years and that was long ago (stuff like WinAmp and CDex).

Message Edited by mikem132 on 03-01-2010 05:24 AM


For one, and most importantly, the mp3 engine in WMP is out of date; and last time I looked (admittedly a while ago) it didn’t support VBR encoding.  For me FLAC support is essential; and is NOT a niche format.  Almost all the audiophiles I hang around use that format as a means to save their CD collections to a lossless format; then it’s an easy task to convert to the lossy codec of choice.

 

That’s great that you find WMP suits your needs.  I just know it isn’t for me.  No one program is going to be right for everybody.

Agreed, VBR is essential…I’ll never encode anything with CBR again, it’s wasteful and,well, 20th century tech. And I’m pretty sure that you’re correct about WMP still using the ancient version of mp3…can’t verify that, because I disabled WMP12 last night in the Windows Features list…no WMC, or WMP for me. I’m also  a FLAC believer.I rip CD’s with EAC , although if it is a brand new CD then either MediaMonkey or xrecode II would do a decent job ripping…EAC works well with old, scratched discs for me. xrecodeII will also convert files, and fast, to any number of different formats.

Message Edited by slotmonsta on 03-01-2010 08:45 AM

…is NOT a niche format.  Almost all the audiophiles I hang around use that format…

That’s pretty much the definition of a niche.

Message Edited by slotmonsta on 03-01-2010 08:45 AM

@jsmaye wrote:


…is NOT a niche format.  Almost all the audiophiles I hang around use that format…


That’s pretty much the definition of a niche.

Maybe your definition, not mine. 

Message Edited by slotmonsta on 03-01-2010 08:45 AM

@fuze_owner_gb wrote:


@jsmaye wrote:


…is NOT a niche format.  Almost all the audiophiles I hang around use that format…


That’s pretty much the definition of a niche.


Maybe your definition, not mine. 

Ignoring the definitions pertaining to architecture or ecology (unless you think them applicable here), Dictionary.com defines niche as “…a situation or activity specially suited to a person’s interests, abilities, or nature” (you and your audiophile companions), and “…a special area of demand for a product or service”, once again describing that narrow subset of objects that are you and your audiophile companions. It’s not an insult, it’s mathematics.

Message Edited by jsmaye on 03-01-2010 08:56 AM

@jsmaye wrote:


@fuze_owner_gb wrote:


@jsmaye wrote:


…is NOT a niche format.  Almost all the audiophiles I hang around use that format…


That’s pretty much the definition of a niche.


Maybe your definition, not mine. 


Ignoring the definitions pertaining to architecture or ecology (unless you think them applicable here), Dictionary.com defines niche as “…a situation or activity specially suited to a person’s interests, abilities, or nature” (you and your audiophile companions), and “…a special area of demand for a product or service”, once again describing that narrow subset of objects that are you and your audiophile companions. It’s not an insult, it’s mathematics.

Message Edited by slotmonsta on 03-01-2010 08:46 AM

And your point is?

Just because WMP (the subject of the thread, BTW; not the definition of a niche) works for some, I still maintain that it is one of the clunkiest programs ever created.  If the “sheep” want to use it, fine. No problem.  I just know that I won’t be using it, unless a massive overhaul is done on the program.

  1. Threads will occasionally stray.

  2. It was topical until you had had enough.

  3. I don’t like WMP either, but largely for aesthetic reasons.

  4. If you don’t like WMP, don’t use it. If your reasons for use or non-use are fallacious or nugatory, careful - someone may call you on it. :wink:

Message Edited by jsmaye on 03-01-2010 09:03 AM

Message Edited by jsmaye on 03-01-2010 09:03 AM

@jsmaye wrote:

  1. Threads will occasionally stray.
  1. It was topical until you had had enough.
  1. I don’t like WMP either, but largely for aesthetic reasons.
  1. If you don’t like WMP, don’t use it. If your reasons for use or non-use are fallacious or nugatory, careful - someone may call you on it. :wink:

Message Edited by jsmaye on 03-01-2010 09:03 AM

Message Edited by jsmaye on 03-01-2010 09:03 AM

I stand by my statement in regards to FLAC.  Maybe in the grand scheme of all users, it is a niche format.  But in the circle of associates I hang around with, it is the de facto standard.  I personally could give a flip if my reasoning is flawed.  This is a forum, not a science project.

Most of the Sansa Gurus here don’t like WMP at all…I guess we hold our audio needs to a higher standard.:stuck_out_tongue:

Who’s bashing my little WiMP friend, my personal PC poltergeist?  I agree, he’s a fickle little guy, but if you’re brave, you can let the application pick up after itself.  I agree, in trying to please everybody, Microsoft’s media player suffers from “code by committee”.  Some functions are simply, for lack of a better word, “entertaining”.

I have to work with it, as so many users undoubtedly use it to rip CDs and manage their Sansa.  It’s presence is required for MTP capability as well, though you aren’t required to use it as a media manager.

Some downright bizarre results can be found by using the “find media info” function when ripping a CD, or if you’re task is editing the ID3 tags for an esoteric CD, but these incidents can be rectified with MP3Tag.

Variable Bit Rate encoding is supported with Windows Media Audio.  Personally, for MP3, if I’m “squishing” my files further, I step over to the LAME MP3 encoder anyway.

As a footnote: when editing the ID3 tags, I’ve always found the best results if the file is deleted from the Sansa, then the UPDATED version is retransferred from the PC.  With the new transfer, the Sansa Fuze likes to build its custom album art thumbnail images (not important on the Clip+ of course).

WiMP has issues playing back my daily BBC podcasts, though every other application I have does so with no difficulties with low bit rates.  I simply use it for the transfers.

The beauty of the Sansa is that you aren’t married to using WiMP, you can try Winamp or Media Monkey, for example.  Every manager has its own unique quirks.

Bob  :smileyvery-happy:

I’ve had a bunch of mp3 players over the years. Several have been Creative. Those of you who find WMP a clunky program or interface must not have experience with Creative Centrale. If you had, you would hold WMP in much higher esteem.

I still don’t understand making a copy of a CD in FLAC, then shrinking a copy for a player. In my case, that’s one copy too many. I have the CD and don’t need a FLAC copy. I have listened to high-bitrate stuff on several players using “better” earphones, and can’t hear the difference, so all that effort is lost on me.

In fact, studies have shown that the majority of users are satisfied with “lossy” music–to the dismay of the record labels (and other “niche” formats like SACD–hey, I have a player and a bunch of those CDs, too—I’m only kidding about using “niche” again, since it seems such a touchy subject).

At any rate, does either WinAmp or MediaMonkey do a better job ripping a CD to mp3? I am trying to standardize my media to mp3 so I don’t have to worry about converting it for the car, motorcycle, Bose Wave Thing, etc., that can’t play any other compressed format. Thanks.

@mikem132 wrote:

I’ve had a bunch of mp3 players over the years. Several have been Creative. Those of you who find WMP a clunky program or interface must not have experience with Creative Centrale. If you had, you would hold WMP in much higher esteem.

I still don’t understand making a copy of a CD in FLAC, then shrinking a copy for a player. In my case, that’s one copy too many. I have the CD and don’t need a FLAC copy. I have listened to high-bitrate stuff on several players using “better” earphones, and can’t hear the difference, so all that effort is lost on me.

In fact, studies have shown that the majority of users are satisfied with “lossy” music–to the dismay of the record labels (and other “niche” formats like SACD–hey, I have a player and a bunch of those CDs, too—I’m only kidding about using “niche” again, since it seems such a touchy subject).

At any rate, does either WinAmp or MediaMonkey do a better job ripping a CD to mp3? I am trying to standardize my media to mp3 so I don’t have to worry about converting it for the car, motorcycle, Bose Wave Thing, etc., that can’t play any other compressed format. Thanks.

There is a very valid reason I rip my CDs to FLAC; then transcode to a lossy format for portable use…that is, CDs are not indestructible.  I’ve been collecting CDs since their introduction and some of my collection are suffering from a condition commonly called “CD rot”.  This is where there was a void in the substrate material and let atmospheric air come in contact with the playable content of the disc.  After a time, these CDs will become unplayable.  So, with hard drives being as cheap as they are, I always keep an “insurance copy” on hard drive in FLAC format, if (I should say when, as CDs have a finite life) this condition occurs with any of my discs.

I’m not saying this is what you should do, all I am saying is what I do.  When you have a collection as massive as mine, and a good chunk is very rare, you want to do everything possible to keep it in playable shape.

If you want as good of rips as you can possibly get, there are two choices; EAC (Exact Audio Copy) or dBPowerAmp.  About any other program will yield slightly inferior results.  But, there are many capable ripping programs out there, and a lot of the differences are mainly due to the interfaces, rather than the quality of the rips.  I personally like dBPowerAmp; I have used EAC, but it’s slow and dBPowerAmp does everything that EAC does, at a faster speed.  

The bottom line is: Use what program you like, and that gives the quality of files that are enjoyable to you.  This isn’t a contest, the only person any software program has to please is Y-O-U.