How many songs PER folder for the Zip?

Guys, I’m considering a Zip but I wanted to know if there is a limitation to how many songs you can have PER folder?

I like to keep lots of songs as I never organize them in any way (by artist, genre or anything) and I just want to make a folder with the type of music I want, go to that folder, set it to shuffle and just let it play and of course, skip the song if I don’t want to hear it at the time.

The sansa e models I had before had a 250 song limit which was a pain.

Someone also told me it would be sluggish if I put too many in one folder…

THanks

George

By the way, what IS the max micro SD card size that works in the zip?

Thanks

@guiri wrote:

By the way, what IS the max micro SD card size that works in the zip?

Others have reported that 64 GB cards work. But my experience with my four Zips is that with the original firmware I can get 64 GB cards to work, but after each restart the player begins to refresh its database. It could be an issue with one or a few files on it (although all are Lame encoded MP3s of usual, compatible bitrates and have the same basic tags recommended on this forum), on the other hand the same card plays fine on the Clip+ and the Clip Sport.

So from my perspective 32 GB is the limit if you want to be on the safe side (and use the original firmware).

I’ve found–as have many others–no issue with 64GB microSDXC cards in the Clips, apart from having more files than the Clips’ database can handle.  And others have reported no issue using a 128GB microSDXC with the Clips, when the alternate firmware Rockbox is used on the player.

I tried one more time to get my Zips working with a 64 GB card. Now I even can’t reproduce my result from above post, database refreshing stops at around 66%. Another Zip doesn’t refresh the database at all, it uses the data from the 32 GB card that was inserted before, so it simply skips the missing songs. This with a very common SanDisk class 10 card which works with Clip+ and Sport.

To my surprise the first Zip I tried it with now works fine with a fully loaded 128 GB Samsung class 10 card, with a lot of Flac files which e.g. the Sport can’t play without interferences.

Well, 32 gigs is plenty so I’ll stick with that.

Anything on the song limit per folder?

Personally, I don’t know the answer there.  But it really shouldn’t pose an issue, as you simply can split all your files, if needed, between folders, and then use the database to play all your music of a specific type (or all). 

Miiikerman, it’s the term “specific type” that gets me and I dont’ understand it. I dont’ label each song at all. Dont’ have time and don’t even know necessarily what the genre would be so I just fill up with music I like and that’s it.

Could you clarify please. I am dense and have a huge problem with reading comprehension.

Thanks

Like most modern audio players, the Clips create an internal database out of the “ID3 tags”–little bits of data (“metadata”)–imbedded into music and audiobook files.  The ID3 tags typically provide identifying information for the file, as to the file’s song title, album or book title, artist name, genre, and year.  The player then displays this info. from the database, when you choose the category option on the player, e.g. Artist, Title, Album, Genre, to choose what to play.  Files purchased (licensed) often already have the ID3 tags filled in for the consumer (although accuracy and sufficiency can vary); if the consumer is ripping the music him/herself from an owned CD (that is, using easy-to-use software to convert the CD audio files, not playable on an audio player, into a computer form that an audio player can play), the software “ripper” typically will have an option to connect to an online database, to automatically fill the ID3 tags in.  Otherwise, a user can add/edit the ID3 tags manually using an ID3 tag editor, such as the well-regarded freeware MP3Tag.

The Clips separately, apart from the database option, have an option to select files to play under a so-called “folder-view,” a folder-and-file based system just like on a PC.  This feature is a helpful one and one that many of us greatly appreciate, for its simplicity.

Note that if you’re not making sure that your music or audiobooks have their ID3 tags filled in and they indeed are not, the Clips’ database will list the files under an “Unknown” category.

Hence, a good reason to check and fill in the ID3 tags, if they already are not:  options and flexibility.   Using the databaseand the ID3 tags, the Clip generally doesn’t care where the files are stored on your player, in how many folders, etc.–instead, it cross-references the files in its database and lets you use the database categories to decide what to play.

Like most modern audio players, the Clips create an internal database out of the “ID3 tags”–little bits of data (“metadata”)–imbedded into music and audiobook files.  The ID3 tags typically provide identifying information for the file, as to the file’s song title, album or book title, artist name, genre, and year.  The player then displays this info. from the database, when you choose the category option on the player, e.g. Artist, Title, Album, Genre, to choose what to play.  Files purchased (licensed) often already have the ID3 tags filled in for the consumer (although accuracy and sufficiency can vary); if the consumer is ripping the music him/herself from an owned CD (that is, using easy-to-use software to convert the CD audio files, not playable on an audio player, into a computer form that an audio player can play), the software “ripper” typically will have an option to connect to an online database, to automatically fill the ID3 tags in.  Otherwise, a user can add/edit the ID3 tags manually using an ID3 tag editor, such as the well-regarded freeware MP3Tag.

The Clips separately, apart from the database option, have an option to select files to play under a so-called “folder-view,” a folder-and-file based system just like on a PC.  This feature is a helpful one and one that many of us greatly appreciate, for its simplicity.

Note that if you’re not making sure that your music or audiobooks have their ID3 tags filled in and they indeed are not, the Clips’ database will list the files under an “Unknown” category.

Hence, a good reason to check and fill in the ID3 tags, if they already are not:  options and flexibility.   Using the database and the ID3 tags, the Clip generally doesn’t care where the files are stored on your player, in how many folders, etc.–instead, it cross-references the files in its database and lets you use the database categories to decide what to play.

Well, I don’t do the id thing nor do I normally play by artist or genre. This is for many reasons but bottom line, I don’t do it.

What I do is put x amount of songs in one folder and then just play them and usually shuffle so, the questions are:

How many songs max per folder for the ZIP (since I went ahead and ordered one from sandisk directly)?

Can I shuffle the songs or play them in order in ONE particular folder?

Can I shuffle and play the songs in ALL folders?

I was going to try to organize songs in BPM in different folders or in BPM in order in ONE folder so that as I increase the tempo at which I’m riding a bike at the gym for instance, I can go up a few songs higher and hence, higher beat.

This is only and when I find a software that’ll do that fairly easily.

THis then begs the question, is it easy to switch to different folders. Mind you, I’m half blind so if I have to read small text, I might be screwed   :slight_smile:

Would all this be better with the rockbox firmware?

Thanks again

George

I don’t have experience with Rockbox, but with the original firmware you can play all songs in a folder in shuffle mode – this in the folder view mode. Changing the folder needs pressing the «home» button and selecting the diesired folder from the folder icon there. For shuffling the whole content of the player you’ll have to choose the «music» mode, alternatively the «card» mode if you want to just play the tracks on the external card. After a few tries you’ll be comfortable with the proceeding, it’s simple.

I wouldn’t worry too much about the number of files per folder; I’m confident that you won’t reach the limit, without having tried it.

Re Rockbox:

One nice feature it offers is different screen faces, developed by users.  Some of those screen faces have been developed with different vision capabilities in mind, offering simpler screen faces or screens with larger text.

Having said that, Rockbox takes some getting used to, although then is easy and fine to use after it’s been learned.  Recommended to at least skim through the Rockbox user manual, available at the rockbox.org website.

I use Rockbox on the Clip Zip. I use the Runner theme, which is large white letters on a black background with no album art. It is very easy to read. If you use the original firmware, make sure to use a card that is class 4 or slower. The original firmware sometimes has trouble with class 10 cards. rockbox seems to handle the class 10 cards okay. I have personally only used class 4 cards in my Sandisk players though. 

As for the maximum number of files per folder with the original firmware, I do believe Sandisk players probably have a 255 item limit for items in a folder. An item though could be a file or a subfolder.  Even a smaller number of files though might bog down the player, especially if they are untagged. The firmware seems to have been designed with the intention of people having a subfolder for each album, and to work best with under 64 files per subfolder.