Fuze to stereo

I’ve got a Fuze and a big kick-ass stereo with a speaker setup that consists of a subwoofer, full range and  outboard horns that go from about 2,000 to 25,000 and the speaker assembly is about 6 ft fall. My radio, VHS/TV and DVD player are routed through a 4 ch selector switch box into a 50 watt amp

I decided to put my Fuze in the mix and got some stereo RCA red/white cables and a 3.5 mm joiner. When I set it up and pulled the trigger, the volume was neglegible. I then got the bright ideas of putting it through the mag cart phono inputs. It’s better but I’m not happy with the fidelity.

I like what I have but is there something better for this purpose in the way of an mp3 player that won’t break the bank? That way I won’t have to keep plugging and unplugging the Fuze

I alos have two Fuze speaker docks, a white one I got on Ebay with two silver speakers about and inch and a pink one  with 4 smaller speakers that I got at Savers

Also I have a spare set of Cyber-Acoustic sub/satellites

Use this. Plug it into the AUX in on your amp or switch box. That way your amp is supplying the power (50 watts) as opposed to approx. 50 milli-watts put out by the itsy-bitsy Fuze. No wonder it won’t power those monster speakers. It’s only designed to drive earbuds and/or phones.

While it’s made for the ‘E’ & ‘C’ 200 series, the Fuze will work in it if you don’t use the pre-molded plastic support modules.

Use this

While it’s made for the ‘E’ & ‘C’ 200 series, the Fuze will work in it if you don’t use the pre-molded plastic support modules.

Plug it into the AUX in on your amp or switch box. That way your amp is supplying the power (50 watts) as opposed to approx. 50 milli-watts put out by the itsy-bitsy Fuze. No wonder it won’t power those monster speakers. It’s only designed to drive earbuds and/or phones. 

I said I run the Fuze through my 50 watt amp. I first ran it through the same input switching box that I run my radio, TV/VHS (the TV reciever is part of the VHS recorder/player) and DVD player. I ran the Fuze in the 4 hole by use of a stereo RCA patch cable with a stereio 3.5 mm plug into the earphone jack, then to the switch box. However, I found the volume from the earphone to be weak, even at High and I had to crank up the amp. Since then I took the output from the Fuze out of the input switch box and put it into the mag cart phono input. I have a small problem with the fidelity now but it is better than having to jack up the amp volume then having to drop it for use with the radio, TV/VHS and DVD. What suprpised me about this is that the output level of the Fuze is audible while that of the other components is not (hence the need for an amp). In the early days of “high efficiency” speakers. a person would demonstrate how good his system was by taking a 9v transistor radio, plugging one end of a chord into the earphone jack and the other into one the speaker boxes and playing the radio through his speaker, which was perfectly feasible.

So that you understand, an input switch box is a box with 4  sets of in’s that take L.R, Vid, S-Vid and sometimes component Vid. Each of these has a corresponding on/off push swich. These feed to a single set of matching out’s (L, R, Vid ect) I route the L and R into the amp and the Vid into the TV set video terminal. I feed my cable box into the TV section of the TV/VHS player/recordeer Techically the box is called a “channe” and since it lets only one input through at a time, it is called a “selector channel”. There is another kind of channel called a multiplexor channel that lets any number of inputs through at once and is also called, if it has a pre-amp and controls, a mixer. This is used mostly in music production. Virtual mixers are part of Audacity, Kristal and Cubase, to name a few. In the 1970’s and early 80’s some “multi-channel” keyboard instrumemnts lik the Crumar Orchestrator, Ymaha Symphonic Keyboard SK-xx series and Moog Opus 3 had bult-in mixers for the separate sections (Piano/harpsi/clav, strings, brass, organ) and some had separate out jacks that could be plugged into a studio mixing board for recording.

Now what I was asking about was if there are mp3 players more suited to being fixed-positioned like the DVD or VHS player that stay in one place, rather than being put in and taken out like I do with my Fuze

@spacepatroller wrote:

I said I run the Fuze through my 50 watt amp. I first ran it through the same input switching box that I run my radio, TV/VHS (the TV reciever is part of the VHS recorder/player) and DVD player. I ran the Fuze in the 4 hole by use of a stereo RCA patch cable with a stereio 3.5 mm plug into the earphone jack, then to the switch box. However, I found the volume from the earphone to be weak, even at High and I had to crank up the amp.

I think you’ll notice a huge difference though between running it through the headphone jack and the line out via the 30-pin connector port on the bottom through the dock. That’s why I suggested it. The dock even has a remote control for basic functions (on/off, play/pause, skip forward/back, volume up/down)

I occasionally use my Fuze as an input to my “stereo”.  I use a cable like yours: 3.5mm plug into the Fuze and 2 RCA plugs into the stereo.  I use the “AUX” jacks on the stereo, but you should be able to use your switcher.  You could try plugging directly into your amp - use the AUX, or TAPE IN, though, NOT the mag cart.  The mag cart puts the signal through equalization to compensate for the way LP’s are recorded.  That’s why your fidelity is poor.

Using the earphone jack on Fuze means that the Fuze (also) controls the volume, unlike the dock (line out) jack.  That’s not a problem - just crank up the Fuze & use your amp to do the adjustment for listening.

HTH,

Bob

I did crank up the Fuze and the thing was still to soft and I had to fiddle with the amp volume. As I said what suprised me was this: the output signal form a compoint, like the TV/VHS player, radio or DVD player is toos weak to be audible, hence the amp. The output of the Fuze is already audible yet when played through the amp, I have to crank the amp up significalntly to get the same sound level as for the other components. I like the dock but it’s a bit pricey and remote controls are not my thing so I use them minimally

@spacepatroller wrote:

 As I said what suprised me was this: the output signal form a compoint, like the TV/VHS player, radio or DVD player is toos weak to be audible, hence the amp. The output of the Fuze is already audible yet when played through the amp, I have to crank the amp up significalntly to get the same sound level as for the other components. I like the dock but it’s a bit pricey and remote controls are not my thing so I use them minimally

Impedance matters.  The output of your DVD is much higher voltage pushed through a higher impedance.  The output of your fuze is low voltage but pushed through a low impedance.  When you plug your headphone jack into the line in, you’re getting the low voltage of the headphone jack and the high impedance of the line in == low output.

@spacepatroller wrote:

I did crank up the Fuze and the thing was still to soft and I had to fiddle with the amp volume. As I said what surprised me was this: the output signal form a component, like the TV/VHS player, radio or DVD player is toos weak to be audible, hence the amp. The output of the Fuze is already audible yet when played through the amp, I have to crank the amp up significantly to get the same sound level as for the other components. I like the dock but it’s a bit pricey and remote controls are not my thing so I use them minimally

When you say a signal is “audible”, I assume you mean that it can drive earphones or speakers.  The component outputs aren’t “audible” (can’t drive speakers) because they are high impedance outputs.  This means that they can’t provide much current, or power.  Which is what speakers require.  They can drive the amp because its inputs are high impedance also.  Meaning that they don’t require much current.  The voltages on the outputs are “line levels” (about 1 volt rms).  This level is consistent between devices so you can switch from DVD input to tape input without worrying about big sound changes.

The Fuze jack output is intended to drive earbuds.  This is not a line level signal.  It is a low(er) impedance output, designed to deliver more current (power).  The voltage level is less than line level.  Meaning your amp has to be turned higher when the Fuze is its input.  The low impedance output of the Fuze is irrelevant to driving the high impedance amp input.

Now, the Fuze has a separate jack for the USB connection, and for docking.  There is a line level output on that connector and there are instructions online for accessing it (used mostly for playing through a car radio).

So, your choices are:

-use the earbud jack & crank up the amp’s volume

  • use a dock.  The dock _might_ have a line level output that you could route into your amp
  • hack the USB cable connector to get line out & feed that to your amp
  • get a preamp that would take the Fuze earbud output & amplifly it before sending it to your amp.

HTH,

Bob

Thankx, You gave me the technical info I was interested in.

Now, I’d like to find one more thing.; a fixed-installation (non-portable) mp3 player that I can just use as a stereo component . I haven’t seena msall stereo preamp in ages. The kind I’m talking about are palm-sized with 1 in and 1 out and a volume slider

@>SpacePatroller wrote:

>Thankx, You gave me the technical info I was interested in.

 

You’re welcome, that’s what forums are for.

 

>Now, I’d like to find one more thing.; a fixed-installation (non-portable) mp3 player that I can just use as a stereo >component .

 

That makes sense.  Then I’m thinking - how would one load such a device?  Well, the internet, or ripping a CD.  Both of which are done on a PC.  So, you could hook up your PC to your stereo (many sound cards have a Line Out).  That might be inconvenient, but it’s a thought.

 

>I haven’t seen a small stereo preamp in ages. The kind I’m talking about are palm-sized with 1 in and 1 out and a volume >slider

 

That’s what I was thinking of, but I haven’t seen one either.

 

Good luck,

Bob

 

 

I would think that a fixed- installation mp3 player would have provisions for a flash reader of some kind. We may have given SanDisk and idea

My DVD player playe mp3DVD’s and Nero makes them as Data DVD’s but I don’t think it supports ID3 tags

As far as hooking up my PC and stereo, My PC has a 3-piece spaker set and the job would require about 40 feet of patch cable and be arranged so that it is not in the way