FLAC

I have a fairly new Fuze, V02.02 and will not play FLAC files. I do not get any sound and it seems to run through the file at a high speed.

The Fuze did not originally have FLAC support. It was added in a firmware update. Have you updated the firmware in yours?

Not yet but it is pretty current, version 02.02.

Just because you have a Vers. 2 machine doesn’t mean the firmware on it is new enough to have the FLAC support.

You can get the latest firmweare here, and see if that helps your FLAC files to play. if it doesn’t, at least your machine is updated, but you’ll have to take a look at why the files don’t play; maybe the ripping software wasn’t set up correctly?

The Fuze skips past file formats it can’t read, briefly showing the filename as you are seeing.

The Fuze will (with recent firmware) play 16-bit FLAC. However, I don’t think it will play 24-bit FLAC.

@black_rectangle wrote:

The Fuze skips past file formats it can’t read, briefly showing the filename as you are seeing.

 

The Fuze will (with recent firmware) play 16-bit FLAC. However, I don’t think it will play 24-bit FLAC.

That’s true, BR. That could be it, if his firmware is up-to-date

@black_rectangle wrote:

The Fuze skips past file formats it can’t read, briefly showing the filename as you are seeing.

 

The Fuze will (with recent firmware) play 16-bit FLAC. However, I don’t think it will play 24-bit FLAC.

That’s true, BR. That could be it, if his firmware is up-to-date.

Thanks to all. I will try the update. I am a little new to this and had only been using WMP. I tried Free Rip to rip some FLAC files.

Check Freerip’s settings or options, wherever they are, to make sure you are using 16-bit.  Though there are endless flame wars about this, 24-bit resolution is definitely overkill for standard CDs, which are also 16-bit. All you gain by making them 24-bit FLAC is larger file size.

Some audiophile CDs are higher than 16-bit, and there are people who record vinyl to 24-bit digital. Some people insist they can hear  the difference between 16-bit and 24-bit with these high-quality sources. However, you (and I) are highly unlikely to hear these subtleties if you’re listening to the Fuze  through typical, or even very good, headphones–much less if you’re using the Fuze as a portable player outside a very quiet listening environment. 

If you are copying your music library to make a digital archive, FLAC is great. It is lossless, so you will not lose any quality in the copying process, and as your playback equipment improves you can always give it all the information that was in the original recording. 

Out in the real world of portable audio, most people can’t tell the difference between high-quality mp3 (320 kbps) and lossless copies. And the mp3s are a fraction of the size, so you can carry around more music.

OK 24-bit FLAC fans, let the flames begin.

I don’t think you’ll hear any difference between 16 and 24 bit FLAC…unless you have the ears of a dog, and really high grade equipment.:wink:

Thanks fo rthe ilnfo. One reason I was interested in FLAC is that I have a good size vinyl collection that I want to digitize. Of course I want the best quality for that at least in part because I think it will be time consuming and not something I want to do twice. I have not been able to figure the best way to get my vinyl on to my PC. If you know anything about that I would appreciate any ideas. Ultimately I ant to play this back on my stereo system which is pretty decent; Magnepan 3.5R’s, NAD silver 2000 amp etc.

Well, if your collection is regular CDs–not 20-bit or SACD or other audiophile CDs–then 16-bit is all you need. Rip them to FLAC with EAC, Exact Audio Copy. EAC 

Foobar2000 also has many fans.

For vinyl, you’ll be recording in realtime. There are now turntables with USB outputs that you can record digitally into your computer–but the cheapo ones probably aren’t worth it, any more than they would be worth it in your stereo system. If you already have a fantastic turntable, you can send it through a preamp and record that output. Google “convert vinyl to digital” and you’ll find lots of advice–some obvious charlatans and salesmen in there, but also a lot of serious help.

For instance this thread  and some of its links.  Or if you really want to marvel at the audiophiles battling it out, search the Hydrogen Audio Forums, but…don’t say I didn’t warn you.

It’s the same as anything else you want to record digitally: get the best source and the cleanest signal chain. That may mean an adapter or two or, if you have a typical laptop or budget home computer,  an external soundcard (not that expensive). It depends on what you’ve got.  You need line-in on your computer or external soundcard–mic-in is almost definitely mono and noisy.  It is time-consuming, so it’s probably worth investing in a good soundcard or preamp if you want to do a serious archive.

There are also a lot of high-quality FLAC rips of albums just floating around online, and if it were something I already own, then I wouldn’t have any qualms about simply downloading them. But the RIAA might have a different opinion.

i prefer dbpoweramp, I know its not free but I just find it more convenient and user friendly. if anybody wants to give it a try http://www.dbpoweramp.com/ I have owned dbp since the ver 11 days(years ago) and have tried foobar2k and use to use EAC(eac isnt bad, but dbp’s built in ripper is a match for it and is easier to use to boot) flac is great for archiving files, I use vorbis for my music and audio books, with rockbox I pull 22-23hrs batt life when listening to audio books and music :smiley: