flac files notshowing up

I have a new Sansa fuss 4G with firmware version 02.02.26A. Updater indicates this is the latest. When I put flac files on they do not show up. I have checked the files and they have correct ID info. Am I missing something.

Thanks

The ID3 tags could be in an unsupported format. The Fuze just ignores a lot of tag versions.

For mp3s, it needs to be ID3v2.3 ISO-8859-1.

Getmp3tag and under Tools/Options/Tags/Mpeg set Write to ID3v2.3 ISO-8859-1. Highlight all your files and Save. 

[Sorry, FLAC tags are different–see posts below]

Under Music, as the very last entry, is Folders. See if your filenames turn up in there–as a last resort, you can navigate them that way.

Message Edited by Black-Rectangle on 08-31-2009 02:41 PM

If I’m not mistaken, vobis comment style tags are required for Ogg and FLAC.  I don’t think ID3 will work on the Fuze for those codecs.

@skinjob wrote:
If I’m not mistaken, vobis comment style tags are required for Ogg and FLAC.  I don’t think ID3 will work on the Fuze for those codecs.

This is correct.  Vorbis and Flac use “Vorbis comments”, which MP3Tag supports.

Thanks for the quick replies. I dl’d MP3tag but cannot find anything about vorbis tags. I tired saving with ID3 iso… but did nothing. Is there an option to save as vorbis tags or comments?

thanks

@plasticman wrote:

Thanks for the quick replies. I dl’d MP3tag but cannot find anything about vorbis tags. I tired saving with ID3 iso… but did nothing. Is there an option to save as vorbis tags or comments?

 

thanks

MP3Tag should automatically use Vorbis Comments when a directory of Ogg or Flac is loaded…at least in every instance that I’ve used the program.  And I’ve used the program a bunch.  If you’ve tried a variety of things with the tags already, they may be a bit corrupted.  You may want to strip the tags completely (using MP3Tag) and reload the proper tags.

If for some reason a flac/ogg file would contain ID3 tags this file would be ignored by the fuze - regardless of correct vorbis comments. So - as fuze_owner-GB suggests - it is a good idea to strip all tags completely before adding new ones.

Again sincere thanks to all  for your input. Why simple things should be so difficult is beyond me. I have tried the following with two different albums containing “flac” files.

I load each folder into Mp3\tag and removed exsisting tag info with the remove item on the file menu.

I then used freeDB to get the tag info and according to mp3\tag this was saved after downloading.

I copied both folders over to the music folder of the internal memory on the Fuze but as before niether shows up.

Thoughts?

Thanks

My entire Master Music library is in FLAC, and on many occasions I’ve loaded these files directly into the fuze without any problems…so I don’t know why you are having an issue.

Do these files appear in folder view?

As B-R suggested, if all else fails you can use folder navigation if they appear there until a solution can be found.

Seriously, I’ve loaded thousands of FLAC and Ogg files into various Sandisk players that support that format without a single issue.  I know that doesn’t help you, but it does tell you that FLAC files should show up.

EDIT:  I do recall that some members were having some issues with ogg and flac files…and the final solution was to reapply the firmware.  I know it is a stretch, but I know in at least a couple of instances where a slight problem in the firmware did cause issues with ogg and flac content.

Message Edited by fuze_owner-GB on 08-31-2009 07:23 PM

Thanks to all for the responses and help offered.

Finally figured it out. My problem was related to the USB settings…Auto. MTP. and MSC.

I hate using Windows explorer as a file manager and have for years used a two panel manager called Total Commander. For some reason I do not understand when I transfer the flac albums with Fuzz in auto or MTP mode they show up inmy managers directory view but not in the Fuzz albums, folders, etc.

If I set the Fuzz to MSC mode the albums show up on the Fuzz.

If I do use Explorer with Fuzz at auto to load albums they show up fine.

I now know how both file managers work and expect no further issues, but am now curious as to what is the difference between MSC and MPT and is one better than the other.

Thanks again

Message Edited by plasticman on 08-31-2009 06:04 PM

@plasticman wrote:

Thanks to all for the responses and help offered.

 

Finally figured it out. My problem was related to the USB settings…Auto. MTP. and MSC.

 

I hate using Windows explorer as a file manager and have for years used a two panel manager called Total Commander. For some reason I do not understand when I transfer the flac albums with Fuzz in auto or MTP mode they show up inmy managers directory view but not in the Fuzz albums, folders, etc.

 

If I set the Fuzz to MSC mode the albums show up on the Fuzz.

 

If I do use Explorer with Fuzz at auto to load albums they show up fine.

 

I now know how both file managers work and expect no further issues, but am now curious as to what is the difference between MSC and MPT and is one better than the other.

 

Thanks again

Message Edited by plasticman on 08-31-2009 06:04 PM

I’m going to defer to B-R on this one!!! :smileyvery-happy:

Glad you got it sorted out…

MTP is designed to work hand-in-glove (or head up keester) with Windows Media Player–for WMP playlists and synching  and for transferring digital-rights keys can only be sent through WMP. It makes your computer think the Fuze is a virtual drive. 

MSC makes the unit work like any other drive in Windows Explorer. Your Total Commander was made to work in MSC mode, not MTP. 

Unless you have DRM music or just adore Windows Media Player, MSC is the way to go. 

@black_rectangle wrote:

MTP is designed to work hand-in-glove (or head up keester) with Windows Media Player–for WMP playlists and synching  and for transferring digital-rights keys can only be sent through WMP. It makes your computer think the Fuze is a virtual drive. 

 

MSC makes the unit work like any other drive in Windows Explorer. Your Total Commander was made to work in MSC mode, not MTP. 

 

Unless you have DRM music or just adore Windows Media Player, MSC is the way to go. 

 

I have to give credit when it’s due… that was an outstanding explanation!! :smiley:

Thanks for the informative explanation. Since I do not use subscription services or even like to use WMP then MSC  is what I will use.

I am curious if anyone would comment on the quality of “flac” files vs MP3 on the Fuzz. MP3’s have never been a favorite of mine but is the Fuzz capable of displaying the difference on playback between flac and MP3. Needless to say hearing is an individual preference but a quick play of a flac file seemed to sound better than an mp3. Just curious…

@plasticman wrote:

Thanks for the informative explanation. Since I do not use subscription services or even like to use WMP then MSC  is what I will use.

 

I am curious if anyone would comment on the quality of “flac” files vs MP3 on the Fuzz. MP3’s have never been a favorite of mine but is the Fuzz capable of displaying the difference on playback between flac and MP3. Needless to say hearing is an individual preference but a quick play of a flac file seemed to sound better than an mp3. Just curious…

Everyone’s ears are different and have different capabilities.  Some find no issue with low to moderate bitrate MP3’s, while others find them unacceptable.  If everything is equal, FLAC should sound better as it is a lossless codec.  But, if your ears can’t tell the difference, you can save quite a bit of storage space by using MP3, ogg, or  wma (lossy).  I’m glad Sandisk gives the consumer the choice.

Fuze_owner-GB is exactly right.

I’d just add that how much difference you detect is going to have a lot to do with your headphones. For basic little buds, mp3 is all you’d need, especially if you’re in a noisy place or using the Fuze while exercising or riding the train. 

For serious headphones, lossless is the way to go.

I did an A-B comparison between a CD and my own high-bitrate mp3 rips on good phones, and–much to my surprise–I could definitely hear a difference in spaciousness and detail. FLAC should sound like the CD. But do your own test in your own circumstances.

@plasticman wrote:

Thanks for the informative explanation. Since I do not use subscription services or even like to use WMP then MSC  is what I will use.

 

I am curious if anyone would comment on the quality of “flac” files vs MP3 on the Fuzz. MP3’s have never been a favorite of mine but is the Fuzz capable of displaying the difference on playback between flac and MP3. Needless to say hearing is an individual preference but a quick play of a flac file seemed to sound better than an mp3. Just curious…

Not sure what bit-rate the MP3 was at, but you can hear the difference between low-mid bitrate MP3 and FLAC with pretty much any device or source material.

On typical computer speakers or a portable device with average phones, it’s unlikely that you could hear the difference between high-bitrate MP3 and FLAC.  However, with high-end phones or a high-quality ASIO sound card hooked up to a high-quality stereo, it’s certainly possible to hear the difference.  It depends somewhat on the source material as well.  Source material with a lot of high-end detail and “space” in the mix tends to reveal the flaws in lossy compression.  It’s much harder to hear a difference with a typical dense, noisy rock mix.

My whole library is FLAC, but I transcode to MP3 for portable use.  For me, FLAC is essential as an archive format because of the sound quality, ability to perfectly recreate a damaged CD, ability to transcode to any formats I want without incurring addition loss, etc.  But for portable use where my priority is to have as much music as possible while maintaining acceptable sound quality, mid-bitrate MP3 is good enough for me.

My Fuze is filled with mp3s, because I generally use it as a portable player, and I’d rather have a bigger collection on it. But I usually rip at LAME extreme (variable bitrate) or 256 kbps.

@skinjob wrote:


@plasticman wrote:

Thanks for the informative explanation. Since I do not use subscription services or even like to use WMP then MSC  is what I will use.

 

I am curious if anyone would comment on the quality of “flac” files vs MP3 on the Fuzz. MP3’s have never been a favorite of mine but is the Fuzz capable of displaying the difference on playback between flac and MP3. Needless to say hearing is an individual preference but a quick play of a flac file seemed to sound better than an mp3. Just curious…


 

Not sure what bit-rate the MP3 was at, but you can hear the difference between low-mid bitrate MP3 and FLAC with pretty much any device or source material.

 

On typical computer speakers or a portable device with average phones, it’s unlikely that you could hear the difference between high-bitrate MP3 and FLAC.  However, with high-end phones or a high-quality ASIO sound card hooked up to a high-quality stereo, it’s certainly possible to hear the difference.  It depends somewhat on the source material as well.  Source material with a lot of high-end detail and “space” in the mix tends to reveal the flaws in lossy compression.  It’s much harder to hear a difference with a typical dense, noisy rock mix.

 

My whole library is FLAC, but I transcode to MP3 for portable use.  For me, FLAC is essential as an archive format because of the sound quality, ability to perfectly recreate a damaged CD, ability to transcode to any formats I want without incurring addition loss, etc.  But for portable use where my priority is to have as much music as possible while maintaining acceptable sound quality, mid-bitrate MP3 is good enough for me.

That’s a misleading statement. Depending on the condition of a person’s hearing, many in this day and age cannot.  Yes, FLAC, WAV or Lossless WMA should sound better; but many can’t tell any difference due to hearing loss or hardware limitations.

@fuze_owner_gb wrote:


@skinjob wrote:

 

Not sure what bit-rate the MP3 was at, but you can hear the difference between low-mid bitrate MP3 and FLAC with pretty much any device or source material.


That’s a misleading statement. Depending on the condition of a person’s hearing, many in this day and age cannot.  Yes, FLAC, WAV or Lossless WMA should sound better; but many can’t tell any difference due to hearing loss or hardware limitations.

I stand corrected.  No slight intended to our hearing impaired friends.  How about “A person with generally good hearing should be able to hear the difference between low-mid bitrate MP3 and FLAC with pretty much any reasonable playback device or source material.”

And of course there’s also the distinction between being able to hear the difference and caring about the difference.  I believe most people (with generally good hearing, of course) are capable of the type of critical listening necessary to spot subtle differences, but I think the vast majority simply don’t care and this is often interpreted as “not able to hear the difference”.  Just my opinion, of course…

Message Edited by Skinjob on 09-03-2009 06:00 PM

Message Edited by Skinjob on 09-03-2009 06:01 PM