Clip+ fragments external card memory into subparts - ?

Well, here’s a new one that I don’t think I’ve seen before:

Picking up my Clip+ yesterday and playing music under the database, everything is fine and all the music is there.  However, when I go under the Music > Folders > External memory option, instead of all the folders on my external 16GB card being listed there, there instead are 3 folder listings, “2GB”, “4GB”, and “8GB”, none of which I had created.  Most (but not all) of my music then is spread and listed between those 3 folders, in alpha order but split randomly between the 3 folders (that is, each folder has “A” listings, “B” listings, etc.).

I assume that I can fix matters by reformatting the external card (and in the meanwhile, all my music is accessible via the player’s database–it’s only the Folder listings that have been fragmented).  But has anyone else seen this before/know the cause?

I certainly haven’t heard of that, nor have I seen it. But then, I generally just hit ‘Play All’ with the Shuffle on, so rarely go to the Folder options and browse. I’ve got a 16 GB card in my Clip+ (until I get my new 32GB card loaded up), so I’ll take a gander at it tonight when I get home and see if it’s doing the same thing.

Sounds like it is time to Rockbox it.:stuck_out_tongue:

Just checked mine out, and see nothing like what you describe. In Music > Folders I have Internal Memory & External SD Card. When I select External SD Card, everything is as it should be; Artist folders > Album folders > Song files, same as when I select Internal Memory.

A head-scratcher to be sure. By any chance did you reformat the card at some point before this music was added and possibly format it to FAT instead of FAT32? Just guessing or grabbing at straws here, but an incorrect format/file cluster allocation is the only thing I can think of at the moment that could cause the ‘partitioning’ that you’re seeing.

I know it’s a PITA, expecially with a 16GB card but you might try formatting it and re-loading the music. That might correct things.

Thanks for checking yours out.  I had never formatted the card, which perhaps always is a good idea.  Will do so now and things, no doubt, will fix–another reminder why it’s good to store one’s music away in an archive somewhere (and not to have one’s only copy on a portable player!)–physical CDs are a good thing …  Thanks, again.

"physical CDs are a good thing "

Yes, but as anyone who has needed to rerip hundreds or especially thousands of CDs will tell you, reripping so many disks is very time consuming and tedious. Imo it is good to keep all the original CDs, but it is also a good idea to make backup copies of the mp3 files and put them on DVD-R disks. Having them on a pc hard drive imo isn’t enough. A few years ago I had a hard drive go bad and lost some photos that I forgot to back up. DVD-R disks are cheap now and can hold around 4.4 GB of data each. The last DVD-R disks I bought were TDK ones that were $10 for a spindle of 50. That is just 20 cents each. These are great for backing up all types of data.

And I’ve also had DVDs that I’ve burned go bad over time …

@miikerman wrote:

And I’ve also had DVDs that I’ve burned go bad over time …

Absolutely right, CD’s and DVD’s can indeed go bad.

One should rip to a lossless format, so that it isn’t necessary to go through the hassle of re-ripping a library, and back these files up on an external hard drive. An external HDD that is only used to serve as a backup unit should last quite a long time, and it should be easy enough to back it up onto a newer unit before it finally dies.

I took the extra step of converting my FLACs to MP3 so I have them already prepared, to load onto my portable players, and I keep the FLACs on the computer…but for those with limited space, some media managers can convert on-the-fly as they load your players.

Portable hard drives can also break. Any storage can break. If one is that concerned, they can make a few backup copies, verify each, then store them in different locations.

@jk98 wrote:

Portable hard drives can also break. Any storage can break. If one is that concerned, they can make a few backup copies, verify each, then store them in different locations.

Well, I use a desktop external drive, not a portable…that’s why I said,“that is only used to serve as a backup unit.”

But yes, there is no one infallible method.

As long as the external drive is not a Seagate 1 TB or above, external drives should have a decent lifespan.  After more than a year, those Seagates are still having problems with clicking sounds and then sudden failure.

I have a Samsung Story Station 1TB model…it was recommended to me by fuze_owner-GB , who has several of them…works flawlessly.:smiley:

@mags1230 wrote:

As long as the external drive is not a Seagate 1 TB or above, external drives should have a decent lifespan.  After more than a year, those Seagates are still having problems with clicking sounds and then sudden failure.

Not all Seagates are created equal.  Like many companies, some products are better than others.  I have a couple of Seagate externals (1 & 2TB) and haven’t had any issues with them for the 2 or so years I’ve had them.  With that said, I tend to agree that it seems that Seagate has had some issues with some of their drives…but the same can be said with other Hard Drive Manufacturers.  For that reason, I tend to get different models and makes, so if a certain company begins having excessive failures, I still have plenty of drives to use.

True, it’s only on some of their external drives, but the number of complaints is very high.  I checked their forum when I was searching for an external HD, and the thread about the clicking sounds and drive failures had at least 350 posts going as far back as a year.  With that kind of a track record for the higher capacity models, I won’t take the risk of having to go through that myself.  I settled for a lower capacity Seagate model with very few posts about problems and am quite happy with it.

@mags1230 wrote:

True, it’s only on some of their external drives, but the number of complaints is very high.  I checked their forum when I was searching for an external HD, and the thread about the clicking sounds and drive failures had at least 350 posts going as far back as a year.  With that kind of a track record for the higher capacity models, I won’t take the risk of having to go through that myself.  I settled for a lower capacity Seagate model with very few posts about problems and am quite happy with it.

I did purchase 500gb seagate drive last year and I did had that issue. I returned the drive to the store and they replaced it with a new one which doesnt make noise.

@mags1230 wrote:

True, it’s only on some of their external drives, but the number of complaints is very high.  I checked their forum when I was searching for an external HD, and the thread about the clicking sounds and drive failures had at least 350 posts going as far back as a year.  With that kind of a track record for the higher capacity models, I won’t take the risk of having to go through that myself.  I settled for a lower capacity Seagate model with very few posts about problems and am quite happy with it.

If you solely base your buying decisions by posts on a forum, very few people would be buying Sansa players.  Take what you read in any forum with a huge grain of salt.  I’ve worked with many of the Hard Drive companies over the years and can honestly say that one isn’t necessarily better than another.  FWIW.  I wouldn’t blink and would purchase another 1 or 2TB Seagate again.