can't hold freakin' button AND plug in with only one hand!

i’m REALLY upset with the user hostility of this device. i plugged it in, and it doesn’t show up in ANY USB port i’ve plugged it into even though it has powered up and updated it’s drivers. i tried to get it to work with the CD and that didn’t work either, then i tried troubleshooting the problem on the internet only to get a cold slap in the face that this player is ONLY for people with two freakin’ hands! who is the stupid jerk that designed this piece of crap to make people who are only able to hold ONE THING AT A TIME unable to get it working?

WHAT WERE YOU THINKING!!!

i’m NOT going to indignify myself with holding the effing player with my mouth to plug it in as per the unreasonable clunky user hostile method this piece of crap demands! i’ve never had a player refuse to show up on my PC… even the cheap $12 coby i’m using now.

if you can’t give me a way to make this thing work with ONLY the ONE effing hand i have, you know where you can stick this!

i managed to get it working by very awkwardly holding the player & button with my pinkie while holding the USB cord with my other fingers, but it took several tries.

the current system sucks and needs to be updated. just put the “tell my PC to quit hiding the clip zip” button on the CD where it belongs as the REAL install. the “it’s made to be used with 2 hands only” design is anti-ergonomic and shouldn’t even exist in a world where scientists have FINALLY discovered this thing called “plug & play”.

i’m not happy about the unit not playing WAVs either, but i knew THAT when i bought it. i know i will be annoyed again in the future whenever i reformat my computer. if there’s some ridiculous reason you can’t figure out how to make YOUR mp3 players plug & play, at least put the patch or setting’s switch whatever on your CDs.

installing this player was very similar to, though not as impossible as using the annoying WONKY air pumps that have a rubber hose you need a second hand to hold while you squeeze the trigger a foot away with your other hand, though a little less impossible.

  1. The procedure you’re describing to get the player to be recognized by your computer is called “forcing” MSC mode. This is only needed when access to the on-board menus are blocked or in-accessible for some reason. You can simply (and with one hand) go into Settings > System Settings > USB mode and manually set it to MSC for. MSC mode allows your computer to see the player as just another flash-based storage medium (like a thumb drive or memory stick) and makes for the easiest connections. MTP mode can be problematic, but is needed if you are planniing to use any DRM-encrypted files. Don’t ever use the Auto mode; it can connect in either MTP or MSC depending on it’s mood, creatinig confusion for you, the user.

  2. There is no CD installation disk required. The unit IS plug & play.

  3. Your player will play WAV files, but because of the size of these files, most everybody wanting lossless music uses FLAC (Free Lossless Audio Codec) format which results in a smaller file size. You may want to consider this.

  4. While your frustration with this new, unfamiliar device is obvious and somewhat understandable, your hostility in your posts is un-necessary. This is a user’s forum and we try to help all who come here looking for answers. So your anger at SanDisk for whatever reasons you have are mis-directed here. If you are unhappy with the device as it is, or doesn’t fit your needs (special or otherwise) feel free to return it to where you bought it from and get a diffferent manufacturer’s product that will not cause you all this grief. Life is too short and there’s too many mp3 players out there for anyone to have to endure using a product that they are unhappy with.

  1. The procedure you’re describing to get the player to be recognized by your computer is called “forcing” MSC mode. This is only needed when access to the on-board menus are blocked or in-accessible for some reason. You can simply (and with one hand) go into Settings > System Settings > USB mode and manually set it to MSC. MSC mode allows your computer to see the player as just another flash-based storage medium (like a thumb drive or memory stick) and makes for the easiest connections. MTP mode can be problematic, but is needed if you are planniing to use any DRM-encrypted files. Don’t ever use the Auto mode; it can connect in either MTP or MSC depending on it’s mood, creatinig confusion for you, the user.

  2. There is no CD installation disk required. The unit IS plug & play.

  3. Your player will play WAV files, but because of the size of these files, most everybody wanting lossless music uses FLAC (Free Lossless Audio Codec) format which results in a smaller file size. You may want to consider this.

  4. While your frustration with this new, unfamiliar device is obvious and somewhat understandable, the hostile tone in your posts is both un-necessary and mis-guided. This is a user’s forum and we try to help all who come here looking for answers. If you are unhappy with the device as it is, or doesn’t fit your needs (special or otherwise) feel free to return it to where you bought it from and get a different manufacturer’s product that will not cause you all this grief; we can’t do anything for you. Life is too short and there’s too many mp3 players out there for anyone to have to endure using a product that they are unhappy with or is too uncomfortable to use.

Agreed.  The easiest way to force MSC is to have the microUSB connection made at the device, hold the button, and plug the other end into the trusty PC USB port.

If you’re needing (or prefer) to use MSC mode, change the default setting on the Clip Zip by going to Settings > System Settings > USB Mode > MSC.

The device will then always connect in MSC mode.

Bob  :smileyvery-happy:

In my humble opinion, there really is not any reason not to set the player’s USB mode, under its Settings, to MSC mode, especially if you are having issues, apart from: if you use DRM’ed files (such as with Rhapsody)–in that case, as a general matter, you’ll need to set the player to USB MTP mode; or you want some extra “bling” when you connect to your computer (for example, seeing the player’s battery charge level on your computer (and even there, people have reported inaccurate readings)–of course, you already can see the approximate level on the player’s battery icon itself when connected to the computer, and also under the System info. screen when disconnected). MSC mode just seems to, well, work. :slight_smile:

I set my players to MSC mode and still use Overdrive.com with DRM-protected audiobooks & music.  Sure, if your player balks at using DRM in MSC mode, go ahead and switch to MTP, but try MSC mode first - it’s a lot more convenient.  Every single Sansa player I have uses Overdrive in MSC mode (2 Clips, 2 Clip+s, and 1 Fuze) - I’m guessing it’s more a matter of my computer setup, why Overdrive works in MSC on my players, while others need MTP mode to use Overdrive??

I broke my hand the other week and currently been using this player with just one hand. I do admit its not that easy, especially plugging the audio jack in on the side seems hard while its clipped on some pants. So the best way to do it is rest it against another object and then push, then clip. Otherwise its really hard.

Although I find it pretty good once you clip it on somewhere and get going. Operating the buttons with one hand while its on my hip seems pretty easy and I’ve got volume control headphones so I can easily utilise the volume above.

The reason I originally purchased the first Sansa was exactly this reason, so I could just connect it to usb and copy songs how I liked. I don’t like synching bloat tools and I have my own folder arrangement in genres which makes finding and playing music so much easier. You just have to make sure it is set to usb - msc mode and it works perfectly with both player and microSD card.

Good luck with it!