Battery question

I’m using my new clip+ to burn in my new headphones (HD650’s).

The run time seems drastically reduced compared to my old clip.

Does anyone know if running these 300 ohm cans will drain the battery faster than the same volume output into simple earbuds?

It drains completely in about 7 hours, where with my old clip it went for a good 15+ hours into my ety’s.

Thanks,

Timothy

Yes, using high-impedance phones will reduce battery life. Sansa battery life is rated for 16 ohm headphones.

snudley wrote:

I’m using my new clip+ to burn in my new headphones (HD650’s).

The run time seems drastically reduced compared to my old clip.

Does anyone know if running these 300 ohm cans will drain the battery faster than the same volume output into simple earbuds?

It drains completely in about 7 hours, where with my old clip it went for a good 15+ hours into my ety’s.

Thanks,

Timothy

I hope you are planning on using a headphone amplifilier with those HD650’s, because the Clip+ does not have the cojones to power them to anywhere near their potential. :wink:

Yes, I do have a cmoy amp I’m using for the time being with these headphones, and am learning about

other affordable amps with more power on the head-fi forums.  

I’m just using the clip+ alone to run up some time on the phones.

snudley wrote:

Yes, I do have a cmoy amp I’m using for the time being with these headphones, and am learning about

other affordable amps with more power on the head-fi forums.  

 

I’m just using the clip+ alone to run up some time on the phones.

As they say in those forums…sorry about your wallet!

For its size, rechargeability, and convenience with the wee Clip, I recommend the FiiO E5.

For breaking in headphones, this is the true purpose of the headphone jack on my PC.  The audio quality of the average computer is ideally suited to break-in use, not much serious listening.

Bob  :smileyvery-happy:

neutron_bob wrote:

For its size, rechargeability, and convenience with the wee Clip, I recommend the FiiO E5.

 

For breaking in headphones, this is the true purpose of the headphone jack on my PC.  The audio quality of the average computer is ideally suited to break-in use, not much serious listening.

 

Bob  :smileyvery-happy:

The E5 won’t be enough to power HD650’s properly though. :stuck_out_tongue:

Hence my recommendation to make use of that nasty PC headphone jack.  The headphone market has changed considerably over the last 20 years or so, with portable devices being the de rigeur audio source.

Interestingly, efficiency doesn’t seem to be of the highest priority.  I tip my hat to Grado for having figured that out.

I have been eyeballing the Practical Devices amplifiers, as they meet my criteria: nice “cool factor”.

Look at all those happy bits and pieces in there!

Bob  :stuck_out_tongue:

Message Edited by neutron_bob on 11-22-2009 01:21 PM

Impedance values don’t mean much. Higher impedance is less load, assuming equal sized drivers with same sized voice coils. The larger hedphones have larger drivers that require more current. Headphone makers should be stating current requirements instead of impedance values.

Example: Someone here stated that the Sansa is rated at 16ohms. If I wire two JBL 12inch 3-way 8ohm speakers in series, I have a 16ohm (nominal) load. My Sansa should power it, right? No way, the big woofers and midranges won’t get near the current they need. The Sansa only outputs maybe 60 miliwatts and the speakers need at least 60 watts. And don’t forget that frequency and inductance are huge part of the AC current calculations. Those low frequency drivers and larger speakers hog most of the current due to there larger (lower impedance) voice coils.

Indeed, it’s all about the available current.  The processor of the Clip is capable of 60mW/ch, with an unused speaker- capable driver in there, with about 150mW if I recall correctly.  The wee battery inside the machine would deplete rapidly under such a load.

Bob   :smileyvery-happy:

neutron_bob wrote:

Indeed, it’s all about the available current.  The processor of the Clip is capable of 60mW/ch, with an unused speaker- capable driver in there, with about 150mW if I recall correctly.  The wee battery inside the machine would deplete rapidly under such a load.

 

Bob   :smileyvery-happy:

 

The processor  may be capable of that much output on paper, but it certainly isn’t that much in practice. My Clip put out significantly less power than my  Samsung player, which is rated at 20mW/ch…I’d say at best half what the Samsung kicks out. I’m not saying the Clip was bad though, not at all. :wink:

Net output is dependent upon the available power, and any ancillary devices in the signal path, on the driver (output) side.  Conserving power is the name of the game, given the small size of the Clip.

We also are limited by the “rail” voltage, a maximum of 3.7v, unless a charge pump is in the circuit.

It would be fun to have a monster Sansa with its own speakers and a big screen, but it exists solely in my mad scientist brain.

For exotic (and inefficient) headphones, especially nice sounding (and fitting) ones, an amplifier is the choice.  Man, there are some nice ones out there, looking at HeadFi.

Bob  :smileyvery-happy:

I cannot use the headphone that come with the Clip+. So I purchased a $20 pair of JVC (over the ear) headphones at the same time I got my Clip+. They are listed as 32Ω. Guess that means I will never get the suggested battery life. 

wplj42 wrote:
I cannot use the headphone that come with the Clip+. So I purchased a $20 pair of JVC (over the ear) headphones at the same time I got my Clip+. They are listed as 32Ω. Guess that means I will never get the suggested battery life. 

That depends on whether or not you use the custom EQ, how loud you turn it up, how often you light up the screen…etc, etc.